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Thread: sir...pls

  1. #1
    wolf_jake16 is offline Newbie
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    Default sir...pls

    i want to ask some etymology of some well known idiomatic expressions...

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    Teia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: sir...pls

    Quote Originally Posted by wolf_jake16 View Post
    i want to ask some etymology of some well known idiomatic expressions...
    Can you be more specific? Which expressions are the ones you`d like to know?

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    Teia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: sir...pls

    Quote Originally Posted by wolf_jake16 View Post
    i want to ask some etymology of some well known idiomatic expressions...
    Just a question : Is English language spoken as first language in the Philippines?
    I`m just curious, nothing more.

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    jargon_dudette is offline Member
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    Default Re: sir...pls

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Just a question : Is English language spoken as first language in the Philippines?
    I`m just curious, nothing more.
    Here in the Philippines, we study and learn English with our vernaculars like Tagalog, Cebuano, etc. So we may call it a second language but never a foreign language. We use English everyday just like our vernacular. We use it for areas in society where our first language is insufficient (i.e. science, math, etc.)Here we never have to take TOEFL or TESL exams.

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    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: sir...pls

    This is a good site for the origins of words and phrases: Online Etymology Dictionary

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    Teia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: sir...pls

    Quote Originally Posted by jargon_dudette View Post
    Here in the Philippines, we study and learn English with our vernaculars like Tagalog, Cebuano, etc. So we may call it a second language but never a foreign language. We use English everyday just like our vernacular. We use it for areas in society where our first language is insufficient (i.e. science, math, etc.)Here we never have to take TOEFL or TESL exams.
    Thank you very much for your answer. It`s very interesting, indeed. When going shopping, should you speak in English or are Tagalog and English interchangeably used?
    Thank you again.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: sir...pls

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Thank you very much for your answer. It`s very interesting, indeed. When going shopping, should you speak in English or are Tagalog and English interchangeably used?
    Thank you again.
    Usually, we speak in Tagalog and not English while shopping. There are just some establishments (elite ones) who prefer English over Tagalog. In schools, for instruction teachers use both. However, in reporting or like activities, we use English.

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    Default Re: sir...pls

    Quote Originally Posted by blouen View Post
    Usually, we speak in Tagalog and not English while shopping. There are just some establishments (elite ones) who prefer English over Tagalog. In schools, for instruction teachers use both. However, in reporting or like activities, we use English.
    Also, as everybody knows(if everybody does really know) the Philippines has been a colony of the USA, and of Spain. Being here in the Philippines for such a long time, they both have influenced greatly our language, Tagalog, is mostly composed of Spanish words and there are some areas here in the Philippines,as far as I know, which uses English and not Tagalog.

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    wolf_jake16 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: sir...pls

    its ok for me for you guys to discussed that thing, English, as of now, has been the language used(not only in teaching)in schools and universities in the Philippines.This is the language used in dealing business transactions, in office also, in the government, in writing letters, etc. Although, it is not our primary language, when we are dealing with other people, or in the internet, we speak English, but Filipinos primary speak Tagalog, at home, or when they are talking to their friends or for some other instances ...but its really urgent, i need some etymology of some idioms....ok, any idioms that you know, or if you know this....

    "Don't make my brown eyes blue"- dont make me angry.
    "Let the grass grow round your feet"- you delay doing things instead of taking action.
    "Keep your wig on!"- to tell someone to calm down.
    "Keep up the Joneses"


    thank you for the reply....

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    jargon_dudette is offline Member
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    Default Re: sir...pls

    Quote Originally Posted by wolf_jake16 View Post
    i want to ask some etymology of some well known idiomatic expressions...
    A face that launched a thousand ship- attributed to Helen of troy. After her thousands of suitors vowed to protect her, her husband requested their help to retrieve Helen back form Paris.
    ARE YOU ASKING FOR THE LIKES OF THIS? If not, is this it:

    Dead ringer

    Meaning: To look like someone else. Example: She told me I was dead ringer for Dilbert. Is that good? Origin: The definition of ringer, from which this phrase comes, is "substituted racehorse." Unscrupulous racehorse owners have a fast horse and a slow horse that are nearly identical in appearance. They run the slow horse until the betting odds reached the desired level, then they substitute the ringer, who can run much faster. Dead in this case means abrupt or exact, like in dead stop, or dead shot.
    Thanks to Jim Hubbell


    you can visit Idiomsite.com or members.aol.com/MorelandC/HaveOrigins.htm

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