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    #1

    Persian Words and Their English Equivalents

    Hello to the kind and drastic moderator's of UsingEnglish.com
    I've some words in Persian and i need their English equivalents. Please answer

    Finglish (Farsi, English): Kaftar Bazi
    Explanation: "Playing with pigeon" = Going to the roof and playing with them.
    Equivalent = ?
    And do you know the name of that place which pigeons are sold?
    -------------------
    Finglish (Farsi, English): Khake patim, koochiketam
    Explanation:
    Khake patim = under someone's leg or foot (being someone's soil). You say this because you want to say that you are nothing in front of him and he is better than you and you are too small (COMPLIMENT or FLATTERING and maybe respect)


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    #2

    Re: Persian Words and Their English Equivalents

    Anybody?

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Persian Words and Their English Equivalents

    To be honest, I can't think of an equivalent English phrase for either of those.

    Is "oh, just go on the roof and play with the pigeons" a phrase used to tell someone to leave you alone? Is it used as a joke to tell someone to engage in a dangerous activity (since they could easily fall off the roof)? If that's the case, an equivalent English phrase would be "Why don't you take a long walk on a short pier?"

    Pigeons in the US are sold mainly by breeders; the birds are kept in either aviaries or coops. Sometimes folks sell pigeons at open air markets, but true pigeon fanciers recommend that you avoid these birds and buy directly from an accredited breeder.


    It's hard to find a corresponding phrase in AmE for your "I am the dirt beneath your shoe" idiom, because, frankly, very few Americans are that humble. Sometimes in jest a person will mock-protest a favor or kindness and say, "I'm not worthy!" But to be honest, such overt statements of humility are usually considered Far and Middle Eastern traditions.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Persian Words and Their English Equivalents

    Quote Originally Posted by Petros View Post
    Hello to the kind and drastic moderator's of UsingEnglish.com
    I've some words in Persian and i need their English equivalents. Please answer

    Finglish (Farsi, English): Kaftar Bazi
    Explanation: "Playing with pigeon" = Going to the roof and playing with them.
    Equivalent = ?
    And do you know the name of that place which pigeons are sold?
    -------------------
    Finglish (Farsi, English): Khake patim, koochiketam
    Explanation:
    Khake patim = under someone's leg or foot (being someone's soil). You say this because you want to say that you are nothing in front of him and he is better than you and you are too small (COMPLIMENT or FLATTERING and maybe respect)
    I have no idea about the pigeon one.

    There's a biblical equivalent for the 'shoe' compliment, which I've heard used occasionally: 'I am not fit to fasten your sandals'. You can adapt this in various ways, depending on the trade practised by the recipient of the compliment - to a fish-monger, for example, 'I am not fit to wash down your counter', (That's a pretty far-fetched example, but I hope you get the idea.)

    b


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    #5

    Re: Persian Words and Their English Equivalents

    Perhaps you can give us an example of when you would use the pigeon one?


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    #6

    Re: Persian Words and Their English Equivalents

    Thanx dear BobK & Ouisch
    But I didn't get the second one (Shoe)
    ----------
    Look, For example you go in the presence of Ronaldinho and start showing your talents and abilities to him. After that Ronaldinho says to you that you are very good at soccer and you say: No, not at all. you are the best; something like this. This continue and you say somethings as a compliment or respect and he says too. Now I need this formal or informal compliments.

    on of them in iran is that "Raise your leg, I'm Under your shoe"
    this means that you are too small to say something or do something. the master is that person and he is expert.


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    #7

    Re: Persian Words and Their English Equivalents

    "I am not fit to fasten your sandals" expresses this neatly = I am not good enough even to do up your shoes.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Persian Words and Their English Equivalents

    'I'm not fit to lace your boots' ( if players like Ronaldinho have laces nowadays - I'm really not sure). Maybe 'I'm not fit to tighten your studs'. Anyway, I'd use 'not fit to...' + some menial service.

    b


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    #9

    Re: Persian Words and Their English Equivalents

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Perhaps you can give us an example of when you would use the pigeon one?
    Yes of course
    Police: Hey , What are they doing in the roof?
    Anonymous: it seems that they are playing with pigeons but they are transferring opium.
    ---------------------
    playing with pigeons doesn't mean that play Tennis or Golf with pigeons. play is something like Affair. having a job for dealing with pigeons or having fun with them. you can make pigeons to fly up to skies and seem like a Dot.Thanx

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