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Thread: Next & The next

  1. #11
    albertino is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Next & The next

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    1. .."The next week means a period starts [correction : starting]from the present moment."
    A typwriting slip. Amended accordingly. Thanks.
    Last edited by albertino; 19-Jul-2007 at 02:52.

  2. #12
    albertino is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Next & The next

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    "I`ll arrive in London next week", Mary said - direct speech

    Mary said [that] she would arrive in London the next/following week - indirect speech
    Where have you found this statement? "The next week" does not mean a period starting from the present moment.
    This is my understanding after digesting the explanations given by "Chambers". : )

    BTW, you're absolutely right, teia_petrescu. But what you and Harry emphasise is on the "direct and indirect speech with "next week" and "the next week". However, I thought that was not what Mohaimel wanted. : (
    Last edited by albertino; 19-Jul-2007 at 02:51.

  3. #13
    burro Guest

    Default Re: Next & The next

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim View Post
    I believe Albertino is right:
    Next week: a point in time.
    The next week: a period of time (7 days)

    Similarly you can say
    Since last week/month
    For the last week.
    I think the reference is to the difficulty many students have when speaking about the previous or coming week. Many students, Spanish and French among them, say "I'm going away the next week" meaning the week following the one they are in. It should be "next week", of course. Comparing "next week" and "the next week", when used to talk about a future week, my description was correct.

  4. #14
    albertino is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Next & The next

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    1. .."The next week means a period starts [correction : starting]from the present moment."

    I am sorry but I don`t agree with you.
    Where have you found this statement? "The next week" does not mean a period starting from the present moment. This phrase, i.e. "the next week", simply means "the following week" :
    "I`ll go there next week"-direct speech
    He said he`d go there the next / following week.

    See, please, Harry`s answer which is very clear regarding the use of "next week" vs. "the next week".

    2. "So, the next month means four weeks starting from today, and the next year means the twelve months from now till the same time in the year after this ."

    - NOT necessarily, i.e. :

    Today is Wednesday. Next week, I am going to see a doctor. - it means that I am going to see a doctor on one of the days of the following week - I did not specify which day : it might be Monday, Tuesday, etc., or :

    It`s July. "I`ll have my holiday next month." It means I planned to leave on holiday in August but still, I did not say the exact day. It might be on August 3rd, or August 14th, etc. - so, it does not necessarily mean I`ll leave on holiday exactly in four weeks from now on.
    In this respect, may I further quote the definition from "Collins Cobuild English Usage" for clarification:

    Next- to talk about the future
    "You use next in front of words such as 'week', 'month', or 'year' to say when something will happen. For example, if it is Wednesday and something is going to happen on Monday, you can say that it will happen next week.
    Warning
    You do not usually use next to refer to a day in the same week. For example, if it is Monday and you intend to ring someone in four days' time, you do not say 'I will ring you next Friday'. You say 'I will ring you on Friday'. If you want to make it completely clear that you are talking about a day in the same week, you use this. For example, the film opens this Thursday at various ABC Cenemas in London.

    the next
    You use the next to refer to any period of time measured forward from the present.
    For example, if it is July 2nd and you want to say that something will happen between now and July 23rd, you say that it will happen in the next three weeks or during the next three weeks. More examples:

    Mr John MacGregor will make the announcement in the next two weeks.
    More than 2,000 of the country's 8,000 state-owned companies are expected to go out of business during the next six months."

    I hope this may help to settle down the dust.
    Last edited by albertino; 30-Mar-2009 at 07:19.

  5. #15
    burro Guest

    Default Re: Next & The next

    <You do not usually use next to refer to a day in the same week. For example, if it is Monday and you intend to ring someone in four days' time, you do not say 'I will ring you next Friday'. >

    You might find that AE speakers do actually use "next Friday" to refer to the Friday of the same week.

    <You use the next to refer to any period of time measured forward from the present. >

    And how about "not that week, the next"?

    Or "I quit my job in '76 and began university the next year."?

    I still think this is a simple problem of a student who misuses the article in front of "week" when talking about the following week.

    Spanish ESL students, for example, will say "Is there a class the next week" or "I went to see my mother the last week". They mean "next week" and "last week", but they translate directly from Spanish, which uses the article in such contexts.
    Last edited by burro; 19-Jul-2007 at 08:23.

  6. #16
    albertino is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Next & The next

    Quote Originally Posted by burro View Post
    <You do not usually use next to refer to a day in the same week. For example, if it is Monday and you intend to ring someone in four days' time, you do not say 'I will ring you next Friday'. >

    You might find that AE speakers do actually use "next Friday" to refer to the Friday of the same week.

    <You use the next to refer to any period of time measured forward from the present. >

    And how about "not that week, the next"?

    Or "I quit my job in '76 and began university the next year."?

    I still think this is a simple problem of a student who misuses the article in front of "week" when talking about the following week.

    Spanish ESL students, for example, will say "Is there a class the next week" or "I went to see my mother the last week". They mean "next week" and "last week", but they translate directly from Spanish, which uses the article in such contexts.
    Sorry, I am talking about BE and have no idea on how Americans or Spaniards say either.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Next & The next

    Thank you all from the sole of my heart as you have enriched my subject.

    I am very glad to be here with a wonderful friends.

    My Best Regards

    Mohaimel

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Next & The next

    I am still confused. Which is the correct way to use "next"?

    Let's say today is Friday 27, 2009 and I want to go fishing on Sunday 29, 2009. What should I say or write?

    I want to go fishing this Sunday, or
    I want to go fishing next Sunday.

    Thanks.

  9. #19
    albertino is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Next & The next

    Quote Originally Posted by quangphan View Post
    I am still confused. Which is the correct way to use "next"?

    Let's say today is Friday 27, 2009 and I want to go fishing on Sunday 29, 2009. What should I say or write?

    I want to go fishing this Sunday, or
    I want to go fishing next Sunday.

    Thanks.
    (Not a teacher)
    quangphan, you cannot use "next" to refer to a day in the same week. Take your example. You cannot say "I want to go fishing next Sunday" if you consider the Sunday as within the same week.
    If you want to make it completely clear that you are talking about a day in the same week, you use "this", as the example you used "I want to go fishing this (coming) Sunday."

  10. #20
    albertino is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Next & The next

    (Not a teacher)

    (A)A gist on the usage of “next” and “the next” for the present.
    (Reference is made to “Collins Cobuild English Usage”)
    Next
    1. When using “next” before “-day, week, month or year, we mean that it is the -day, week, month or year that follows immediately after the present week, month or year. For example,
    (i)Say, today is Wednesday. If we use “next week” in an utterance, it means the week that follows immediately after Sunday if you take the Sunday as the cut-off day of the week.
    So, “Goodbye! See you next week!” It means any day in the following week.
    Will you be at the seminar next Thursday?

    (ii)Say, the current month is March. If we use “next month”, it means the month April that follows immediately after March.
    So, “Goodbye! See you next month!” It means any day/week during the period from 1st to 30th April.

    (iii)Say, the current year is 2009. If we use ”next year”, it means the year 2010 that follows immediately after 2009.
    So, “Goodbye! See you next year!” It means any day/week/month in the following year.
    Next year will be fine (=the year starting next January).
    (If the current year is 2009)I am going abroad next Easter (in 2010).

    the next
    2. When using “the next” before week, month or year, we mean that it is the week, month or year measured forward from the present.
    (i) Say today is Wednesday.
    If we use “the next week” in an utterance, it means any day of the week during the period of the present Wednesday - next Wednesday (i.e. the seven days starting from the present).

    (ii)Again, say today is 9th March, 2009 (Monday).
    So, “Goodbye! See you the next month!” It means any day/week of the month during the period of 9th March, 2009 – 8th April 2009(Wednesday)(the 31 days starting from 9th March, 2009).

    (iii) Again, say today is 9th March, 2009.
    If we use “the next year”, it means any day/week/month of the year during the period of 9th March, 2009 – 8th April, 2010(=the 365 days starting from 9th March, 2009).
    The next year will be fine(=the twelve months starting from March, 2009).

    Points to note:
    (i)Before "decade or century", we do not say "next decade/century but in the next decade or during the next century."
    (ii)Do not say “next day and next morning/afternoon/evening/night” but “tomorrow and tomorrow morning/afternoon/evening/night”.
    (iii)Sometimes, you may see the following sentences:
    (a)We miss the bus, and have to wait thirty minutes for the next one.
    (b)The next meeting will be held on 8th May, 2009.
    Here, the use of “the next” has nothing to do with the present as those stated above. It merely indicates that the bus or the meeting is only one of the scheduled buses or meetings (i.e. one of the series of events/things).
    (iv)The rules for “next” and “the next” are also applicable to “last” and “the last”.

    (B) A gist on the usage of “next” and “the next” for the past.
    (Reference is made to “Collins Cobuild English Usage”)
    (i) We say something happened “the next day” or “the following day” if we talk about the past and want to say that something happened on the day after events that we have been describing. For example,
    I asked him the next day about his slurs on me.
    I went to Macau for sightseeing the following day.
    However, in stories, “next day” is sometimes used, especially at the beginning of a clause:
    Next day we all went to bed rather late.

    (ii)“Next, the next, and the following can also be used before “morning”
    Next morning he worked on his project again but felt tired.
    The next morning, as I was leaving for school, the telephone rang.
    The following morning he checked out of the motel and took the train to Sichuan, China.
    (iii)However, in front of “afternoon, evening or the name of a day of the week, we normally only use “the following”:
    I arrived at the Hong Kong airport the following afternoon.
    He was going to leave for Beijing the following Friday.

    Last edited by albertino; 31-Mar-2009 at 03:42.

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