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  1. #41
    negar is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: How the word f*ck has become important

    i coudnt see the movie because they have blocked the utube in my country

    f*ck

  2. #42
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    Angry Re: How the word f*ck has become important

    I think there is still an element of vulgarity to it, which is why so many people seem unable to say things without using it - because, dare I say it, many of them are vulgar themselves!

    This word was banned in our dictionaries up until very recently but there is now a general misconception that it is accepted. But question: how many right-minded people would use it naturally at an interview for a job? Or when talking to someone we respect? Or when writing for a newspaper?

    It is not an acceptable word and personally I don't think it ever will be.

    SB

  3. #43
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    Exclamation Re: How the word f*ck has become important

    So Riverkid a challenge: spend a day using the word in every single sentence you utter and see what kind of day you have.

    Let me know if there really aren't any other words which you could use to express yourself, and let me know if its 'cachet' benefits your existence!

    Actually, 'f**k it' I already know the answer.

  4. #44
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default Re: How the word f*ck has become important

    Quote Originally Posted by Shakespeare's brother View Post
    So Riverkid a challenge: spend a day using the word in every single sentence you utter and see what kind of day you have.

    Good day, S'sB.

    I never suggested that it had to be a word that is commonly used, nor did I suggest that it is suitable for all situations. It serves a purpose for some situations, yours below is but one example.


    Let me know if there really aren't any other words which you could use to express yourself, and let me know if its 'cachet' benefits your existence!

    Actually, 'f**k it' I already know the answer.
    Yes, certainly there are other words. English is full of synonymous choices for words.

  5. #45
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    Default Sometimes it fucks up

    Sometimes, it helps a lot. It has nothing to do with sex in all sentences. We use it to swear as well. We can use it with our friends. But in business, dealing with teachers or parents and formal dealings I think it's a bit hard to use it. I feel I'm impolite and rude.
    Last edited by Devil's tear; 11-Mar-2008 at 14:31.

  6. #46
    Batfink is offline Member
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    Default Re: How the word f*ck has become important

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Smith View Post
    All the people in Germany are Saints. They haven't got such a word.
    And if English speakers use this word instead of fullstop, here in Russia they say it three-four times in one sentence. I mean not f*ck, but its Russian translation. What's interesting,not only men but also women use it.
    Most think that the word is of Germanic origin.

    The use of the word denotes a lack of vocabulary. But when you are angry, hurt, it has an excellent sound. In other words, used sparingly, the word has impact.

  7. #47
    Batfink is offline Member
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    Default Re: How the word f*ck has become important

    Quote Originally Posted by negar View Post
    i coudnt see the movie because they have blocked the utube in my country

    f*ck

  8. #48
    Batfink is offline Member
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    Default Re: How the word f*ck has become important

    Quote Originally Posted by mary joe View Post
    I agree to that. We are not perfect so it is impossible to live without sin [in this case using bad language].
    mmm...

    Quote Originally Posted by mary joe View Post
    I don´t know, I think it comes bad by how you use the word ¨fuck¨. When you use it just by annoying people it becomes bad, especially when you are shouting the word. When you use it to express your deeper feelings, that the person feels that you really mean what you say, I think then it can be termed as ¨acceptable¨ but not a really good word. Good and bad words are categorized by people with different standards.
    Using the word "fuck" is not a sin. Annoying people might be. I have yet to see a reference in which a word is a sin. Unless, of course, it is a blasphemous word, but I pay no attention to psychobabble.

  9. #49
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    Default Re: How the word f*ck has become important

    The word 'f*ck' does seem to have a cognate in German 'ficken', whose use is restricted to the physical side of things, although perhaps 'bumsen' is (or was) the true equivalent for that.

    As riverkid's excellent examples show, it's an awfully versatile little word: it functions as a verb (plus phrasal spinoffs with 'up', 'over', and 'around/about', as well as its incorporation into set expressions), as a noun (plus derivative '-er' agent noun), and as an adjective using both the present and past participles. The present participle also morphs into an adverb as in 'I couldn't f*cking care', which is sometimes expanded to 'f*cking-well' as in 'I couldn't f*cking-well care').

    It and 'bloody' are the only (?) words used as infixes in English (admittedly not as a morphological feature), as in 'un-bloody-believable' and riverkid's equivalent example with the F word, as it's euphemistically called when the need arises in polite society.

    The verb's even acquired a slightly mocking (?) euphemistic variant 'effing and blinding' as in 'He was effing and blinding all afternoon', and 'effing and blinding' may occasionally crop up as a gerund as in 'There was much effing and blinding in response to the announcement'.

    A national treasure, no less.

  10. #50
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    Default Re: How the word f*ck has become important

    The word 'f*ck' does seem to have a cognate in German 'ficken', whose use is restricted to the physical side of things, although perhaps 'bumsen' is (or was) the true equivalent for that meaning.

    As riverkid's excellent examples show, it's an awfully versatile little word: it functions as a verb (plus phrasal spinoffs with 'up', 'over', and 'around/about', as well as its incorporation into set expressions), as a noun (plus derivative '-er' agent noun), and as an adjective using both the present and past participles. The present participle also morphs into an adverb as in 'I couldn't f*cking care', which is sometimes expanded to 'f*cking-well' as in 'I couldn't f*cking-well care').

    It and 'bloody' are the only (?) words used as infixes in English (admittedly not as a morphological feature), as in 'un-bloody-believable' and riverkid's equivalent example with the F word, as it's euphemistically called when the need arises in polite society.

    The verb's even acquired a slightly self-conscious euphemistic variant 'effing and blinding' as in 'He was effing and blinding all afternoon', and 'effing and blinding' may occasionally crop up as a gerund as in 'There was much effing and blinding in response to the announcement'.

    A national treasure, no less.

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