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Thread: Answers please!

  1. #1
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    Default Answers please!

    I am seeking your expert guidance to understand the correct structure of the below sentences. Please be as detailed with your answer as possible.

    1. a) The test comprises of two sections - Medicine theory and English. Both the sections are compulsory.
    b) The test is comprised of two sections - Medicine theory and English. Both the sections are compulsory.

    2. a) Questions which have more than one option shaded will be marked wrong.
    b) Questions which have more than one options shaded will be marked wrong.

    Your inputs will surely help. Thanks.

    vkn

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Answers please!

    Quote Originally Posted by vkn View Post
    I am seeking your expert guidance to understand the correct structure of the below sentences. Please be as detailed with your answer as possible.

    1. a) The test comprises of two sections - Medicine theory and English. Both the sections are compulsory.
    b) The test is comprised of two sections - Medicine theory and English. Both the sections are compulsory.

    2. a) Questions which have more than one option shaded will be marked wrong.
    b) Questions which have more than one options shaded will be marked wrong.

    Your inputs will surely help. Thanks.

    vkn
    #1 The test comprises two sections: Medicine Theory and English. Both sections are compulsory.

    Since the tests are made up of two sections, the verb comprises does not need "of" in this context.

    #2 [a] is the correct form. "one option" = singular > "more than [one option]" indicates the identifying of two or more options.

    As a side issue - you have the word "shaded" - do you perhaps mean "selected"?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Answers please!

    Additionally, about the verb comrpise:
    comprise (verb) to constitute, be composed or made up of, to include.
    Usage: This verb is a common false cognate of "compose." Remember, your only options are: "the book is composed of several chapters" or "the book comprises several chapters." Never say or write "is comprised of"! Source: Word of the Day - yourDictionary.com
    Usage Note: The traditional rule states that the whole comprises the parts and the parts compose the whole. In strict usage: The Union comprises 50 states. Fifty states compose (or constitute or make up) the Union. Even though careful writers often maintain this distinction, comprise is increasingly used in place of compose, especially in the passive: The Union is comprised of 50 states. Source: comprise - Definitions from Dictionary.com
    Examples
    1. a) The test comprises of two sections - Medicine theory and English.
    1. b) The test is comprised of two sections - Medicine theory and English.

    Note,

    Both sections are compulsory.
    Both of the sections are compulsory.
    Both the sections are compulsory.

    About the phrase *one options. Adjectives don't agree in number with the nouns they modify; however, quantifiers do. The adjective one is an example of that. It's a quantifier and it refers to a single unit, so don't let the more than part fool you:
    Examples
    2. a) Questions which have more than one option shaded will be marked wrong.
    2. b) Questions which have more than one options shaded will be marked wrong.
    I believe shaded refers to a computerized fill-in the circle kind of test, right?

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