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  1. #1
    mei Guest

    factual journalism

    Hi,

    I don't quite understand the underlined sentences. Could anybody help me?


    "It will be my earnest aim that The New York Times give the news, all the news, in concise and attractive form, in language that is parliamentary in good society, and give it as early, if not earlier, than it can be learned through any other reliable medium; to give the news impartially, without fear or favor, regardless of any party, sect or interest involved; to make the columns of The New York Times a forum for the consideration of all questions of public importance, and to that end to invite intelligent discussion from all shades of opinion."

    This quotation highlights a convergence of the discourses of factual journalism with those of professional responsibility vis-a-vis the public sphere, in general, and the interests of its affluent readers, in particular. With its new motto of 'All the news that's fit to Print', the New York Time sought to claim for itself the status of an open forum for debating public affairs. This when the boundaries of its definition of 'serving the public' were recurrently projected in a way which justified existing relations of power and privilege, namely those of wealthy white males, as bieng consistent with American democracy.


    Thank you very much. :o

    Mei

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Re: factual journalism

    Quote Originally Posted by mei
    Hi,

    I don't quite understand the underlined sentences. Could anybody help me?


    "It will be my earnest aim that The New York Times give the news, all the news, in concise and attractive form, in language that is parliamentary in good society, and give it as early, if not earlier, than it can be learned through any other reliable medium; to give the news impartially, without fear or favor, regardless of any party, sect or interest involved; to make the columns of The New York Times a forum for the consideration of all questions of public importance, and to that end to invite intelligent discussion from all shades of opinion."

    This quotation highlights a convergence of the discourses of factual journalism with those of professional responsibility vis-a-vis the public sphere, in general, and the interests of its affluent readers, in particular. With its new motto of 'All the news that's fit to Print', the New York Time sought to claim for itself the status of an open forum for debating public affairs. This when the boundaries of its definition of 'serving the public' were recurrently projected in a way which justified existing relations of power and privilege, namely those of wealthy white males, as bieng consistent with American democracy.


    Thank you very much. :o

    Mei
    << in language that is parliamentary in good society >>

    I think that refers to the type of language that is used in "polite society"--language that is not coarse, rude or vulgar.

    << and to that end to invite intelligent discussion from all shades of opinion >>

    They are inviting discussion from people of various opinions.

    <<This quotation highlights a convergence of the discourses of factual journalism with those of professional responsibility vis-a-vis the public shpere, in general, and the interests of its affluent readers, in particular>>

    Factual journalism is, I suppose, journalism that deals in facts. (That is contrary, I suppose, to sensationalism or gossip.)

    The writer decided that the New York Times felt that it owed it to its readers to produce a professionally managed, responsible newspaper, but that it had a special obligation to its affluent readers.

    <<This when the boundaries of its definition of 'serving the public' were recurrently projected in a way which justified existing relaitons of power and privilege, namely those of wealthy white males, as bieng consistent with American democracy>>

    Those "wealthy white males" were considered by some to represent the interests of trhe country as a whole.

    8)

  3. #3
    mei Guest

    Re: factual journalism

    Hi, Ronbee, thank you very much. You do me a great favor.

    Mei

  4. #4
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Re: factual journalism

    You're welcome. :)

    8)

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