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Thread: metaphor or no

  1. zxcv9991
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    #1

    metaphor or no

    I am in a english class and my teacher says this statement is a metaphor and i just don't agree with him just wondering what you think?

    After a sluggish first half, the team finally got on track.

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    #2

    Re: metaphor or no

    Quote Originally Posted by zxcv9991 View Post
    I am in a english class and my teacher says this statement is a metaphor and i just don't agree with him just wondering what you think?

    After a sluggish first half, the team finally got on track.
    I may be wrong, but I can`t see any metaphor in your sentence.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: metaphor or no

    The statement isn't itself a metaphor, but it uses two. The first is such an old metaphor that some people would say it's not one - "sluggish" [="behaving like a slug"]. But many words are based on metaphors if you look back far enough in their history; the word "muscle" means "little mouse".

    The second is "on track".

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    #4

    Re: metaphor or no

    I don't really think it is either - you could stretch and say that the first half was being compared to a slug (sluggish), but it isn't really making that comparison - it's just using that adjective. I'm with you on this one.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: metaphor or no

    I think there is no bright line between idiomatic uses like "on track" or "got off-track" and a metaphor like "the wheels fell off the train."

    Since none of the team members literally ran on a track, it's a metaphorical use... or is it an idiom? It's really not clear.

    [a writer, not a teacher]

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