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Thread: questions

  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

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    Hello!
    Please explain the difference b/n following phrasal verbs
    put off, put back, call off
    are they interchangable?
    Thant you!

  2. #2
    Susie Smith Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by guest
    Hello!
    Please explain the difference b/n following phrasal verbs
    put off, put back, call off
    are they interchangable?
    Thant you!


    put back = postpone
    put off = postpone
    call off = cancel

  3. #3
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    I would say that put back means return something. Example:
    • Tommy, put that back where it belongs.


    Otherwise, I agree with Susie.

    :)

  4. #4
    Susie Smith Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I would say that put back means return something. Example:
    • Tommy, put that back where it belongs.


    Otherwise, I agree with Susie.

    :)
    Put back has more than one meaning. I agree with you, but in this case it's obvious that the question refers to the meaning I used. Before I was initiated into the mysteries of the "British" language, I also knew only the meaning you know.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Put back has more than one meaning. I agree with you, but in this case it's obvious that the question refers to the meaning I used. Before I was initiated into the mysteries of the "British" language, I also knew only the meaning you know.
    To my North American knowledge it has one general meaning.
    I believe it's push back that you may be referring to, as in

    Let's push back (i.e. postpone) the day of the meeting.

    All the best,

    Are there really 'mysteries of the "British" language'? Psst, what's the difference between English and the "British" language?

  6. #6
    Susie Smith Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Put back has more than one meaning. I agree with you, but in this case it's obvious that the question refers to the meaning I used. Before I was initiated into the mysteries of the "British" language, I also knew only the meaning you know.
    To my North American knowledge it has one general meaning.
    I believe it's push back that you may be referring to, as in

    Let's push back (i.e. postpone) the day of the meeting.

    All the best,

    Are there really 'mysteries of the "British" language'? Psst, what's the difference between English and the "British" language?
    Not really. None whatsoever. :wink:
    George Bernard Shaw said that the United States and Britain were two nations divided by a common language.

    In BE:
    put back phr v to arrange for an event to start at a later time or date; postpone ( Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English)
    In AE: same as RonBee said

    Why anybody would call a trunk a boot or a hood a bonnet is a mystery to me. :D :wink:

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Why anybody would call a trunk a boot or a hood a bonnet is a mystery to me. :D :wink:
    That's because you don't know any better.

  8. #8
    Susie Smith Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Why anybody would call a trunk a boot or a hood a bonnet is a mystery to me. :D :wink:
    That's because you don't know any better.
    Touché!

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Anytime.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Why anybody would call a trunk a boot or a hood a bonnet is a mystery to me. :D :wink:
    boot, n., automotive UK, the sense “luggage compartment” evolved from the meaning “outside step for attendants on a coach.”

    bonnet, n., automotive, UK, hood.

    Hope some of the mysteries have been cleared up. :D

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