Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: True to form

  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default True to form

    Dear Teachers,

    Is "true to form" always used in the negative sense? Could you say,
    for example, "True to form, he did a perfect job"?

  2. #2
    Susie Smith Guest

    Default Re: True to form

    Quote Originally Posted by YY
    Dear Teachers,

    Is "true to form" always used in the negative sense? Could you say,
    for example, "True to form, he did a perfect job"?
    I believe it has a negative connotation.

    True to form, he did a sloppy job.

    :wink:

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,674
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    In British English it can be used in a positive context:

    Arsenal, true to form, won the match.

    However, it has a slightly negative idea, suggesting that they are winning too easily, as if it's becoming a bit boring.

  4. #4
    Tokyolily is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    39
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: True to form

    [quote="Susie Smith"]
    Quote Originally Posted by YY
    Dear Teachers,

    Is "true to form" always used in the negative sense? Could you say,
    for example, "True to form, he did a perfect job"?
    I believe it has a negative connotation.

    True to form, he did a sloppy job.

    Dear Susie,

    Thank you so much for your kind reply. It was very helpful. I discovered this website recently and I am delighted. What a wonderful idea! I work as a simultaneous interpreter for Japanese and English so I am sure I shall be asking many more questions in the future and would be grateful if you could help me in the future as well. Thank you again.

    With kind regards

    Yuri Yoshikuni

  5. #5
    Tokyolily is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    39
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    In British English it can be used in a positive context:

    Arsenal, true to form, won the match.

    However, it has a slightly negative idea, suggesting that they are winning too easily, as if it's becoming a bit boring.
    Dear tdol,

    Thank you for your reply. It was very interesting to know the difference between American and British English in the usage of the phrase.

    With kind regards,

    YY

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Yuri Yoshikuni
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    In British English it can be used in a positive context:

    Arsenal, true to form, won the match.

    However, it has a slightly negative idea, suggesting that they are winning too easily, as if it's becoming a bit boring.
    Dear tdol,

    Thank you for your reply. It was very interesting to know the difference between American and British English in the usage of the phrase.

    With kind regards,

    YY
    Hold on. You've made an erroneous assumption. :( With regards to the phrase 'true to form', it can have either a positive connotation or a negative connotation. Both are used in North American as well as in British English.

    All the best,

    Yoroshiku onegai shimasu :D

  7. #7
    Tokyolily is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    39
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by Yuri Yoshikuni
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    In British English it can be used in a positive context:

    Arsenal, true to form, won the match.

    However, it has a slightly negative idea, suggesting that they are winning too easily, as if it's becoming a bit boring.
    Dear tdol,

    Thank you for your reply. It was very interesting to know the difference between American and British English in the usage of the phrase.

    With kind regards,

    YY
    Hold on. You've made an erroneous assumption. :( With regards to the phrase 'true to form', it can have either a positive connotation or a negative connotation. Both are used in North American as well as in British English.

    All the best,

    Yoroshiku onegai shimasu :D

    Thank you to you too, Casiopea-san.

    YY

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by Yuri Yoshikuni
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    In British English it can be used in a positive context:

    Arsenal, true to form, won the match.

    However, it has a slightly negative idea, suggesting that they are winning too easily, as if it's becoming a bit boring.
    Dear tdol,

    Thank you for your reply. It was very interesting to know the difference between American and British English in the usage of the phrase.

    With kind regards,

    YY
    Hold on. You've made an erroneous assumption. :( With regards to the phrase 'true to form', it can have either a positive connotation or a negative connotation. Both are used in North American as well as in British English.

    All the best,

    Yoroshiku onegai shimasu :D
    Itsu demo ii, wa. :D

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,674
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I only said British English because I wasn't sure about AE usage. I do that because sooften I found there to be a difference.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I only said British English because I wasn't sure about AE usage. I do that because so often I found there to be a difference.
    Well, from the audience's point of view, this comparision thing is, in my opinion, turning fairly odious.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. form
    By Taka in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 28-Oct-2004, 05:01
  2. YOU, the respected form
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Jul-2004, 22:50
  3. True to form
    By bingbing in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 31-Dec-2003, 16:04
  4. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 21-Jul-2003, 03:19
  5. first form vs base form
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Jan-2003, 16:01

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •