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  1. Anonymous
    Guest
    #1

    "sensación térmica"

    If anyone there knows Spanish (Argentinian, I should say) in our weather forecast we have both the temperature of the day and the sensacion termica, that is to say, how it "feels". If it's a windy day, it might feel colder, if it's wet, it may feel hotter. Is there any similar expression in English? My students keep asking me this question whenever we see the weather. Thanks a lot,
    Sandra

  2. Susie Smith
    Guest
    #2

    Re: "sensación térmica"

    Quote Originally Posted by sandra pavesio
    If anyone there knows Spanish (Argentinian, I should say) in our weather forecast we have both the temperature of the day and the sensacion termica, that is to say, how it "feels". If it's a windy day, it might feel colder, if it's wet, it may feel hotter. Is there any similar expression in English? My students keep asking me this question whenever we see the weather. Thanks a lot,
    Sandra
    I visited www.weather.com to find the answer to your question. I noticed that below the actual temperature of a city, there are the words "Feels like" + the temperature it feels like.
    For instance:

    Buenos Aires 30° C
    Feels like 28° C

    Why don't you check out this site yourself? You can read the forecast both in English and Spanish and compare them.

    In the US people often talk about the wind-chill factor, but this is a little different.

    wind-chill factor (w¹nd“ch¹l”) n. The temperature of windless air that would have the same effect on exposed human skin as a given combination of wind speed and air temperature.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #3

    Re: "sensación térmica"

    Quote Originally Posted by sandra pavesio
    If anyone there knows Spanish (Argentinian, I should say) in our weather forecast we have both the temperature of the day and the sensacion termica, that is to say, how it "feels". If it's a windy day, it might feel colder, if it's wet, it may feel hotter. Is there any similar expression in English? My students keep asking me this question whenever we see the weather. Thanks a lot,
    Sandra
    In addition to SS, sensacion termica means, thermal sensation:

    ..."the cooling effect of moving air on a body expressed as the amount of heat lost per unit area per unit of time and taking into account both temperature and wind speed".
    Source: KudoZ History: Questions and Answers

    All the best,

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