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Thread: NSc? Assonance?

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    #1

    NSc? Assonance?

    Read some acronym words from "looking-for-partners" ads and want to know the meanings of them:

    NSc = non-scene
    SA = straight-atcing
    SL = straight-looking

    But what do non-scene, straight-atcing and straight-looking mean??

    And ... also ... "1-2-1" for "one-to-one relationship".
    Do this kind of words like "1-2-1" called "assonance" in English?

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    #2
    They're used by gays.

    Non-scene = not involved with the open gay scene, in bars, clubs, restaurants, etc.
    SA = not camp (a mannerised formof behaviour with a number of feminine traits)
    SL = doesn't dress, etc, in a style that is recognisably gay

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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    They're used by gays.

    Non-scene = not involved with the open gay scene, in bars, clubs, restaurants, etc.
    SA = not camp (a mannerised formof behaviour with a number of feminine traits)
    SL = doesn't dress, etc, in a style that is recognisably gay
    Hmmm....ok....but what does it mean by "not involved with the open gay scene"??
    And "camp"?
    And "formof"?...
    So...."SA" means gays trying to act like they're not gay?

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    #4
    Gays who are open about it and move in predominantly gay circles, choosing gay bars, etc, are on the scene. Those who don't but have same sex relationships are non-scene.

    Camp = effeminate, like transvestites (at the most extreme form) formof = form of (typo)

    It doesn't mean that they are pretending not to be gay, though they may not want people to know, but that they don't project an openly gay front.

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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Gays who are open about it and move in predominantly gay circles, choosing gay bars, etc, are on the scene. Those who don't but have same sex relationships are non-scene.

    Camp = effeminate, like transvestites (at the most extreme form) formof = form of (typo)

    It doesn't mean that they are pretending not to be gay, though they may not want people to know, but that they don't project an openly gay front.
    Ok, how about the assonance question?
    Terms like "1-2-1" for "one-to-one",
    are they called assonance words in English?

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    #6
    Not that I'm aware of, but I could be wrong.

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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Not that I'm aware of, but I could be wrong.
    Ah...I guess the word I want is not assonance but "homophones"??

    As in "Rhythm, rhyme and play on the sounds words" found here:

    http://www.abacon.com/pubspeak/organize/style.html

    :D

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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Eway
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Not that I'm aware of, but I could be wrong.
    Ah...I guess the word I want is not assonance but "homophones"??

    As in "Rhythm, rhyme and play on the sounds words" found here:

    http://www.abacon.com/pubspeak/organize/style.html

    :D
    Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds.

    Example:
    fleet feet sweep by sleeping geeks.

    Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds.

    Example:
    lady lounges lazily

    Click Here for more Literary Terms

    Homophone
    'homo' means, same and 'phone' means, sound (i.e. words that sound the same).

    Example: see, sea; pale, pail; fair, fare

    Homophones belong to a larger group called Homonyms. Homonyms are words that sound the same but that are spelled differently.

    1-2-1 ~ one-to-one
    to, too, and two are homophones. The number '2', however, is not a word. It's a figure. That is, 'two' and 'to' are homophones, not '2' and 'to'.

    1 = one
    2 = two = to ('two' and 'to' are homophones)
    1 = one

    All the best,

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