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Thread: Says who?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi

    Ron, you are just wonderful!
    Thanks.


    Still sober.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" althought I suppose it is possible.

    :)

    Ron,

    Why do you put "but" and "although" together within a sentence?
    It is supposed to be either

    Mike might be technically right, I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.

    or

    Mike might be technically right, I suppose it is possible,
    but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?"



    :wink:

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" althought I suppose it is possible.

    :)

    Ron,

    Why do you put "but" and "although" together within a sentence?
    It is supposed to be either

    Mike might be technically right, I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.

    or

    Mike might be technically right, I suppose it is possible,
    but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?"



    :wink:
    Re:
    • Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.


    I can't say that I have heard of that rule you mention, but "but" and "although" appear in separate clauses. (I corrected the spelling of although.) Technically, there should be a comma after "although", but because of the other punctuation I omitted it. As I mentioned, while they are both in the same sentence, "but" and "although" are in separate clauses, "but" starting one clause and "although" starting the other one. It is really not unusual at all. Do a Google search for "but+although" and you should find quite a few sentences like that. Go to: www.google.com. Or just go here:http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&i...but%2Balthough.

    Actually, "but although" is quite common.

    :)

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" althought I suppose it is possible.

    :)

    Ron,

    Why do you put "but" and "although" together within a sentence?
    It is supposed to be either

    Mike might be technically right, I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.

    or

    Mike might be technically right, I suppose it is possible,
    but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?"



    :wink:
    Re:
    • Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.


    I can't say that I have heard of that rule you mention, but "but" and "although" appear in separate clauses. (I corrected the spelling of although.) Technically, there should be a comma after "although", but because of the other punctuation I omitted it. As I mentioned, while they are both in the same sentence, "but" and "although" are in separate clauses, "but" starting one clause and "although" starting the other one. It is really not unusual at all. Do a Google search for "but+although" and you should find quite a few sentences like that. Go to: www.google.com. Or just go here:http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&i...but%2Balthough.

    Actually, "but although" is quite common.

    :)

    According to
    http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/conjunctions.htm
    To suggest a contrast that is unexpected in light of the first clause: "Joey lost a fortune in the stock market, but he still seems able to live quite comfortably."
    ==> It's wrong to put "but" and "although" together, or I can rewrite as "Although Joey lost a fortune in the stock market, he still seems able to live quite comfortably."


    I think I understand what you mean.
    ==>
    Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" Although (I have never heard of anybody saying it), I suppose it is possible.

    The red part of sentence is omitted. Is that right?



    OK. Suppose I omit the sentence beginning with "Mike might be......".
    ==>
    I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" , but I suppose it is possible.

    or

    Although I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?", I suppose it is possible.

    Is that right?

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" althought I suppose it is possible.

    :)

    Ron,

    Why do you put "but" and "although" together within a sentence?
    It is supposed to be either

    Mike might be technically right, I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.

    or

    Mike might be technically right, I suppose it is possible,
    but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?"



    :wink:
    Re:
    • Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.


    I can't say that I have heard of that rule you mention, but "but" and "although" appear in separate clauses. (I corrected the spelling of although.) Technically, there should be a comma after "although", but because of the other punctuation I omitted it. As I mentioned, while they are both in the same sentence, "but" and "although" are in separate clauses, "but" starting one clause and "although" starting the other one. It is really not unusual at all. Do a Google search for "but+although" and you should find quite a few sentences like that. Go to: www.google.com. Or just go here:http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&i...but%2Balthough.

    Actually, "but although" is quite common.

    :)

    According to
    http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/conjunctions.htm
    To suggest a contrast that is unexpected in light of the first clause: "Joey lost a fortune in the stock market, but he still seems able to live quite comfortably."
    ==> It's wrong to put "but" and "although" together, or I can rewrite as "Although Joey lost a fortune in the stock market, he still seems able to live quite comfortably."


    I think I understand what you mean.
    ==>
    Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" Although (I have never heard of anybody saying it), I suppose it is possible.

    The red part of sentence is omitted. Is that right?
    That is a perfectly legitimate way of looking at it, but no, I didn't omit anything. Instead, I used although as a "bridge" to I suppose it is possible.



    OK. Suppose I omit the sentence beginning with "Mike might be......".
    ==>
    I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" , but I suppose it is possible.

    or

    Although I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?", I suppose it is possible.

    Is that right?[/quote]

    Those are perfectly good.

    :D

  6. #16
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    I understood the meaning of your previous reply, I was just being picky about the grammatical structure. Sometimes I find myself confined in a grammar cage.


    Kiss goodbye to grammar.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    I understood the meaning of your previous reply, I was just being picky about the grammatical structure. Sometimes I find myself confined in a grammar cage.


    Kiss goodbye to grammar.
    Not so fast! The original sentence has three independent clauses, not just two. Therefore, the two conjunctions connect clause one to clause two and then clause two to clause three. That is the grammatical explanation for the use. :wink:

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    I understood the meaning of your previous reply, I was just being picky about the grammatical structure. Sometimes I find myself confined in a grammar cage.


    Kiss goodbye to grammar.
    Not so fast! The original sentence has three independent clauses, not just two. Therefore, the two conjunctions connect clause one to clause two and then clause two to clause three. That is the grammatical explanation for the use. :wink:
    Good points, there.

    The "bridge" is just amazing. It conncects 3 independent clauses tightly.

    Thanks, dear Mike and Ron!

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    I understood the meaning of your previous reply, I was just being picky about the grammatical structure. Sometimes I find myself confined in a grammar cage.


    Kiss goodbye to grammar.
    Not so fast! The original sentence has three independent clauses, not just two. Therefore, the two conjunctions connect clause one to clause two and then clause two to clause three. That is the grammatical explanation for the use. :wink:
    Good points, there.

    The "bridge" is just amazing. It conncects 3 independent clauses tightly.

    Thanks, dear Mike and Ron!
    You're very welcome.

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