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  1. #11
    Susie Smith Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    We use 'stressed out' in British English.
    When you are "stressed out" or " all wound up", you can go to the gym to "unwind", "wind down", "unbend", or simply "relax".

    :D :wink:

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    You can 'reduce' tension too.
    thanks all of you. I have another question.
    I've been accumulating tension these days. Let's go to gym to release tension. ----correct?
    I've been piling up tension these days. Let's go to gym to unleash tension.-----correct?
    waiting for answers.
    1. I'm tense. I'm going to the gym to release some tension.
    2. I've built up a lot of tension this week.

    'unleash tension' is odd. It means, set tension free so that it can pursue something or attack someone/something (e.g. unleash the dog).

    All the best,
    thanks again. erm..... can i say '' I'm tensed up ''? too ?
    Try,

    I feel tense.
    I'm feeling a little tense right now.
    You're making me (feel) tense.
    I'm tense.
    I've got/built up a lot of tension in my neck/back/shoulders.

    All the best,

  3. #13
    darren Guest

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    thanks a million to tdol, Casiopea, Susie and Ron. You all are a great help to me. Here, another question: I got worked on these few days. Does it imply that the speaker has been buiding up tension and feel annoyed?
    waiting for reply.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    thanks a million to tdol, Casiopea, Susie and Ron. You all are a great help to me. Here, another question: I got worked on these few days. Does it imply that the speaker has been buiding up tension and feel annoyed?
    waiting for reply.
    Try,

    I got (all) worked up (i.e. stressed out).

    I got worked on means, a) someone gave you a massage :D , or b) someone gave you a beating, notably the Mafia.

  5. #15
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
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      • UK
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      • Philippines
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    We use 'work over' for beat somebody up.

  6. #16
    darren Guest

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    i have another question here. Do we say ' we guys are not going for the party or Our guys are not going for the party? which is the correct one?

  7. #17
    Susie Smith Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    i have another question here. Do we say ' we guys are not going for the party or Our guys are not going for the party? which is the correct one?
    We guys are not going to the party.

  8. #18
    darren Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    i have another question here. Do we say ' we guys are not going for the party or Our guys are not going for the party? which is the correct one?
    We guys are not going to the party.
    thankz susie. erm, can you please tell me when can we use 'our guys'....?

  9. #19
    Susie Smith Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    i have another question here. Do we say ' we guys are not going for the party or Our guys are not going for the party? which is the correct one?
    We guys are not going to the party.
    thankz susie. erm, can you please tell me when can we use 'our guys'....?
    Our is a possessive adjective, so it means the guys belong to you in some way or are members of your group, etc. :wink:

    Coach: Our guys (team members) are definitely not going to the party. We have an important game tomorrow.

  10. #20
    darren Guest

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    another question here.
    is it proper English to say ' by right'? i heard some people saying 'long time no see'. I was told that it is broken English, but i'd like to hear from you all. Any opinions are welcomed.

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