Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 33
  1. #21
    darren Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    i have another question here. Do we say ' we guys are not going for the party or Our guys are not going for the party? which is the correct one?
    We guys are not going to the party.
    thankz susie. erm, can you please tell me when can we use 'our guys'....?
    Our is a possessive adjective, so it means the guys belong to you in some way or are members of your group, etc. :wink:

    Coach: Our guys (team members) are definitely not going to the party. We have an important game tomorrow.
    Can you please explain further about the difference between 'our guys' and 'we guys'? Is there any case we can use both with the same meaning?

  2. #22
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,401
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Our guys- imagine you are not part of a school team, but support it- you would use 'our guys', whereas if you said 'we guys', you would be a team member talking to other members.

  3. #23
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,570
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    What Tdol said. :wink:

    It works that way in AE too.

    :)

  4. #24
    darren Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    What Tdol said. :wink:

    It works that way in AE too.

    :)
    thanks for the clear explanation. Anyway, how about my second last post?
    waiting for reply.

  5. #25
    Susie Smith Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    another question here.
    is it proper English to say ' by right'? i heard some people saying 'long time no see'. I was told that it is broken English, but i'd like to hear from you all. Any opinions are welcomed.

    It's okay to say "by rights" meaning justly/in fairness.

    e. g. By rights he should get the promotion. I have heard many people say, "by right", but I'm not sure whether this variant is considered proper.

    Yes, "long time no see" is broken English, but nevertheless I use it now and then when I see somebody I haven't seen in a long time. I don't think it's as common as it used to be, though. :wink:

  6. #26
    darren Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    another question here.
    is it proper English to say ' by right'? i heard some people saying 'long time no see'. I was told that it is broken English, but i'd like to hear from you all. Any opinions are welcomed.

    It's okay to say "by rights" meaning justly/in fairness.

    e. g. By rights he should get the promotion. I have heard many people say, "by right", but I'm not sure whether this variant is considered proper.

    Yes, "long time no see" is broken English, but nevertheless I use it now and then when I see somebody I haven't seen in a long time. I don't think it's as common as it used to be, though. :wink:
    i see. erm....So is 'by rights' common in daily conversation?

  7. #27
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,401
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It is used in conversation. I don'tthink it's very common, but it isn't dependent on register.

  8. #28
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,570
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Darren, I'm not sure what you meant by second last post. Did Susie and Tdol answer your question? (It would seem so.)


    :)

  9. #29
    darren Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Darren, I'm not sure what you meant by second last post. Did Susie and Tdol answer your question? (It would seem so.)


    :)
    yeah. My second last post asked about 'by rights'. Susie and Tdol had already explained on it. Anyway, I'd like to hear from you too. :wink:

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by S. Smith
    It's okay to say "by rights" meaning justly/in fairness.

    e. g. By rights he should get the promotion. I have heard many people say, "by right", but I'm not sure whether this variant is considered proper.
    I agree with S. Smith.

    By (all) rights, he should get the promotion.
    By (his) right, he should get the promotion.

    All the best,

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. a tension
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-Jul-2003, 01:01
  2. relieve or release stress?
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Apr-2003, 18:37
  3. in tension with
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-Apr-2003, 17:16

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •