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  1. #1
    darren Guest

    Default new question

    when someone resembles another person, we'd say takes after him/her. But i m wondering if we can say they look similar? they are similar in appearance to each other.-correct? they look alike= they look similar??
    besides, i have another totally different question: In Japan, people'd say 'otsukaresama' when some has finished his work. When it is translated, it'd mean ' thanks for your hard work'. Is there a similar expression in English? what would English native speakers say? other than that, when someone is leaving to work, s/he 'd say 'ittekimasu' ( which means i m going out and will come back later) and the one remains in the building( for example at home) 'd say 'itterashya' in respone ( sory dont know how to translate this into English) I have been thinking if native speakers say the same like thing...........

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    'They look similar' doesn't work for me; it's not wrong, but it doesn't collocate.

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    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    In Japan, people say 'otsukaresama' when some has finished work. When it is translated, it means ' thanks for your hard work'. Is there a similar expression in English? What would English native speakers say? Other than that, when someone is leaving to work s/he'd say 'ittekimasu', which means, I'm going out and will come back later, and the one remaining (at home) would say, 'itterashya' in response.
    "Otsukaresama deshita" is roughly You did well today. Keep up the good work.

    "Ittekimasu" is I'm leaving now. I'll see you/be back later.

    "Itterashya" is roughly, OK. See you later then.

    All the best,

  4. #4
    darren Guest

    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    In Japan, people say 'otsukaresama' when some has finished work. When it is translated, it means ' thanks for your hard work'. Is there a similar expression in English? What would English native speakers say? Other than that, when someone is leaving to work s/he'd say 'ittekimasu', which means, I'm going out and will come back later, and the one remaining (at home) would say, 'itterashya' in response.
    "Otsukaresama deshita" is roughly You did well today. Keep up the good work.

    "Ittekimasu" is I'm leaving now. I'll see you/be back later.

    "Itterashya" is roughly, OK. See you later then.

    All the best,
    thanks. Anyway, mind telling me if the native speakers also practice the same thing? like saying ' you did well today. Keep it up!' and so on. well, in my country, i never heard people saying it. erm.... sometimes we say keep it up to encourage people, but isnt it different here ( the saying in Japan)? actually i was merely curious about it. looking forward to hearing from you soon.

  5. #5
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    when someone resembles another person, we'd say takes after him/her. But i m wondering if we can say they look similar? they are similar in appearance to each other.-correct? they look alike= they look similar??
    besides, i have another totally different question: In Japan, people'd say 'otsukaresama' when some has finished his work. When it is translated, it'd mean ' thanks for your hard work'. Is there a similar expression in English? what would English native speakers say? other than that, when someone is leaving to work, s/he 'd say 'ittekimasu' ( which means i m going out and will come back later) and the one remains in the building( for example at home) 'd say 'itterashya' in respone ( sory dont know how to translate this into English) I have been thinking if native speakers say the same like thing...........
    I would accept "They look similar". In that case, "look" is a linking verb.

  6. #6
    darren Guest

    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    when someone resembles another person, we'd say takes after him/her. But i m wondering if we can say they look similar? they are similar in appearance to each other.-correct? they look alike= they look similar??
    besides, i have another totally different question: In Japan, people'd say 'otsukaresama' when some has finished his work. When it is translated, it'd mean ' thanks for your hard work'. Is there a similar expression in English? what would English native speakers say? other than that, when someone is leaving to work, s/he 'd say 'ittekimasu' ( which means i m going out and will come back later) and the one remains in the building( for example at home) 'd say 'itterashya' in respone ( sory dont know how to translate this into English) I have been thinking if native speakers say the same like thing...........
    I would accept "They look similar". In that case, "look" is a linking verb.
    thanks Mike. I have other questions here. What is the difference between ' in the moment ' and ' at the moment' ? Besides, can you please explain the usage and differences between ' as if (present tense)' and ' as if (past tense)' ? If have examples will be better. Looking forward to hear from you.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    when someone resembles another person, we'd say takes after him/her. But i m wondering if we can say they look similar? they are similar in appearance to each other.-correct? they look alike= they look similar??
    besides, i have another totally different question: In Japan, people'd say 'otsukaresama' when some has finished his work. When it is translated, it'd mean ' thanks for your hard work'. Is there a similar expression in English? what would English native speakers say? other than that, when someone is leaving to work, s/he 'd say 'ittekimasu' ( which means i m going out and will come back later) and the one remains in the building( for example at home) 'd say 'itterashya' in respone ( sory dont know how to translate this into English) I have been thinking if native speakers say the same like thing...........
    I would accept "They look similar". In that case, "look" is a linking verb.
    thanks Mike. I have other questions here. What is the difference between ' in the moment ' and ' at the moment' ? Besides, can you please explain the usage and differences between ' as if (present tense)' and ' as if (past tense)' ? If have examples will be better. Looking forward to hear from you.
    For at the moment/in the moment, read this thread. If you have further questions, please ask.

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/vi...1a35748ba63dbf

    The conjunction "as if" is used to present a clause that is contrary to reality. It is often followed by the subjunctive.

    He acts as if he were a rock star. (Were is subjunctive here, to show an unreal situation, rather than past tense).

    He acted as if he had been elected King.

  8. #8
    darren Guest

    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    when someone resembles another person, we'd say takes after him/her. But i m wondering if we can say they look similar? they are similar in appearance to each other.-correct? they look alike= they look similar??
    besides, i have another totally different question: In Japan, people'd say 'otsukaresama' when some has finished his work. When it is translated, it'd mean ' thanks for your hard work'. Is there a similar expression in English? what would English native speakers say? other than that, when someone is leaving to work, s/he 'd say 'ittekimasu' ( which means i m going out and will come back later) and the one remains in the building( for example at home) 'd say 'itterashya' in respone ( sory dont know how to translate this into English) I have been thinking if native speakers say the same like thing...........
    I would accept "They look similar". In that case, "look" is a linking verb.
    thanks Mike. I have other questions here. What is the difference between ' in the moment ' and ' at the moment' ? Besides, can you please explain the usage and differences between ' as if (present tense)' and ' as if (past tense)' ? If have examples will be better. Looking forward to hear from you.
    For at the moment/in the moment, read this thread. If you have further questions, please ask.

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/vi...1a35748ba63dbf

    The conjunction "as if" is used to present a clause that is contrary to reality. It is often followed by the subjunctive.

    He acts as if he were a rock star. (Were is subjunctive here, to show an unreal situation, rather than past tense).

    He acted as if he had been elected King.
    erm..... i've already read the thread you recommended. Anyway, it is about 'in a moment' right? I know that in a moment means soon, but how about in the moment? Probably it is very rare in use, but honestly I heard this phrase before and thus I'm a little confused with 'at the moment'. Other than that, can you please explain the difference between this sentences:
    You talk as if you are angry.
    You talk as if you were angry.
    Honestly, I'm rather familliar with the second sentence. I thought the first one is wrong in first place, but later i found it out in a grammar book. Yet, I need opinions from you all. Thanks in advance.
    Have a good day :D :D

  9. #9
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    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    In Japan, people say 'otsukaresama' when some has finished work. When it is translated, it means ' thanks for your hard work'. Is there a similar expression in English? What would English native speakers say? Other than that, when someone is leaving to work s/he'd say 'ittekimasu', which means, I'm going out and will come back later, and the one remaining (at home) would say, 'itterashya' in response.
    "Otsukaresama deshita" is roughly You did well today. Keep up the good work.

    "Ittekimasu" is I'm leaving now. I'll see you/be back later.

    "Itterashya" is roughly, OK. See you later then.

    All the best,
    thanks. Anyway, mind telling me if the native speakers also practice the same thing? like saying ' you did well today. Keep it up!' and so on. well, in my country, i never heard people saying it. erm.... sometimes we say keep it up to encourage people, but isnt it different here ( the saying in Japan)? actually i was merely curious about it. looking forward to hearing from you soon.
    Native North American speakers of English, to my knowledge, do not use "Otsukaresama deshita". I'm from Canada but I've worked and lived in Japan for the past five years. Everyday after work my colleagues shout out, "Otsukaresama deshita!" to me and, of course, I shout it back in return to them. My colleagues have asked me more than once about how to say the phrase in English, but given that it's not a North American custom, the best I can offer them is a rough translation, "Thanks for all your hard work today" or "Thanks for doing such a great job."

    In Japan, the group is more important that the individual. At the end of the day, saying "Otsukaresama deshita" is a way of telling the individual within the group that one's labour is not without recognition. It originated as a way of building up pride in one's work. That is, the idea is that the individual will take pride in her work if her 'hard work' is recognized at the end of the day. These days, however, "Otsukaresama deshita" doesn't hold all that much meaning for young people in the work force. It's like saying, "OHayo Gozaimasu!" or "Konnichiwa", a set greetings, much like native English speakers use "Hello".

    All the best,

  10. #10
    darren Guest

    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    In Japan, people say 'otsukaresama' when some has finished work. When it is translated, it means ' thanks for your hard work'. Is there a similar expression in English? What would English native speakers say? Other than that, when someone is leaving to work s/he'd say 'ittekimasu', which means, I'm going out and will come back later, and the one remaining (at home) would say, 'itterashya' in response.
    "Otsukaresama deshita" is roughly You did well today. Keep up the good work.

    "Ittekimasu" is I'm leaving now. I'll see you/be back later.

    "Itterashya" is roughly, OK. See you later then.

    All the best,
    thanks. Anyway, mind telling me if the native speakers also practice the same thing? like saying ' you did well today. Keep it up!' and so on. well, in my country, i never heard people saying it. erm.... sometimes we say keep it up to encourage people, but isnt it different here ( the saying in Japan)? actually i was merely curious about it. looking forward to hearing from you soon.
    Native North American speakers of English, to my knowledge, do not use "Otsukaresama deshita". I'm from Canada but I've worked and lived in Japan for the past five years. Everyday after work my colleagues shout out, "Otsukaresama deshita!" to me and, of course, I shout it back in return to them. My colleagues have asked me more than once about how to say the phrase in English, but given that it's not a North American custom, the best I can offer them is a rough translation, "Thanks for all your hard work today" or "Thanks for doing such a great job."

    In Japan, the group is more important that the individual. At the end of the day, saying "Otsukaresama deshita" is a way of telling the individual within the group that one's labour is not without recognition. It originated as a way of building up pride in one's work. That is, the idea is that the individual will take pride in her work if her 'hard work' is recognized at the end of the day. These days, however, "Otsukaresama deshita" doesn't hold all that much meaning for young people in the work force. It's like saying, "OHayo Gozaimasu!" or "Konnichiwa", a set greetings, much like native English speakers use "Hello".

    All the best,
    I see. I wonder if there are any similar sayings or customs? How about in UK , US, European countries, Australia and New Zealand? All kinds of opinions are welcome.
    cheers :wink:

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