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  1. #11
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    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    erm..... i've already read the thread you recommended. Anyway, it is about 'in a moment' right? I know that in a moment means soon, but how about in the moment? Probably it is very rare in use, but honestly I heard this phrase before and thus I'm a little confused with 'at the moment'.
    I'm sorry. I thought there was an explanation of "in the moment" in that thread. I am aware of only one use of "in the moment" an that refers to someone actually focusing on what they are feeling or doing at a particular time. If heard it used for actors, to mean that they are actually feeling what their characters would be feeling at a certain time. I think it is also used in some "personal growth" courses.

    Other than that, can you please explain the difference between this sentences:
    You talk as if you are angry.
    You talk as if you were angry.
    Honestly, I'm rather familliar with the second sentence. I thought the first one is wrong in first place, but later i found it out in a grammar book. Yet, I need opinions from you all. Thanks in advance.
    Have a good day :D :D
    The first means "You sound angry right now."
    The second can mean: It seems that you were angry then (past). or
    I know you aren't angry (unreal subjunctive) but your words make it appear that you are angry.

    The reason that there are two possibilities for the second is that "were" is the same after "you" in the indicative (past) and the subjunctive (hypothetical/unreal). The subjunctive reading would be more common, in my opinion. :wink:

  2. #12
    darren Guest

    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    erm..... i've already read the thread you recommended. Anyway, it is about 'in a moment' right? I know that in a moment means soon, but how about in the moment? Probably it is very rare in use, but honestly I heard this phrase before and thus I'm a little confused with 'at the moment'.
    I'm sorry. I thought there was an explanation of "in the moment" in that thread. I am aware of only one use of "in the moment" an that refers to someone actually focusing on what they are feeling or doing at a particular time. If heard it used for actors, to mean that they are actually feeling what their characters would be feeling at a certain time. I think it is also used in some "personal growth" courses.

    Can you please explain 'personal growth' again together with examples?

    Other than that, can you please explain the difference between this sentences:
    You talk as if you are angry.
    You talk as if you were angry.
    Honestly, I'm rather familliar with the second sentence. I thought the first one is wrong in first place, but later i found it out in a grammar book. Yet, I need opinions from you all. Thanks in advance.
    Have a good day :D :D
    The first means "You sound angry right now."
    The second can mean: It seems that you were angry then (past). or
    I know you aren't angry (unreal subjunctive) but your words make it appear that you are angry.

    The reason that there are two possibilities for the second is that "were" is the same after "you" in the indicative (past) and the subjunctive (hypothetical/unreal). The subjunctive reading would be more common, in my opinion. :wink:
    So do you think that the first one is common in daily use? Say, if my question leaves a blank like this: You talk as if you ____ angry. What would you put? Perhaps you might say that it depends on the context, but just imagine there is no more context but the only sentence.
    Thank you. Have a nice day. :wink:

  3. #13
    darren Guest

    Default Re: new question

    I'm sorry. I thought there was an explanation of "in the moment" in that thread. I am aware of only one use of "in the moment" an that refers to someone actually focusing on what they are feeling or doing at a particular time. If heard it used for actors, to mean that they are actually feeling what their characters would be feeling at a certain time. I think it is also used in some "personal growth" courses.

    [quote]

    Can you explain further on 'personal growth' ? It'll be great together with some examples. :wink:

  4. #14
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    So do you think that the first one is common in daily use? Say, if my question leaves a blank like this: You talk as if you ____ angry. What would you put? Perhaps you might say that it depends on the context, but just imagine there is no more context but the only sentence.
    Thank you. Have a nice day. :wink:
    In my opinion, "were" would be the far more common word there. The sentence is most likely about something that appears to be different than it is. That is when we use the subjunctive.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: new question

    Quote Originally Posted by darren
    Can you explain further on 'personal growth' ? It'll be great together with some examples. :wink:
    There are many "gurus" out there who make a living writing books or putting on seminars designed to teach people how to live better lives. In my experience, most are filled with jargon and catch phrases. One such seminar was called "Be here now". It spoke about people being "in the moment" -- not daydreaming about vacation when they are at work or worrying about the office when they are on vacation.

    One of the best lines was "When you people are doing laundry, you think about sex; when you are having sex, you are think about doing the laundry. In my experience, he was only half right.

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