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  1. #1
    johnwee@115.com.yahoo Guest

    Default Reflexive pronoun

    Is this sentence correct : Perhaps one day, you will yourself read the book which contains this story.

    Or is this more correct: Perhaps one day, you yourself will read the book which contains this story.

    A group of students is or are...

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    Default Re: Reflexive pronoun

    Ex: Perhaps one day, you yourself will read the book which contains this story.

    Dictionary Information: Definition Yourself - Description Meaning Thesaurus
    _____________

    Singular subject: A group is ...
    Plural subject: Students are ...

  3. #3
    Teia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Reflexive pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Ex: Perhaps one day, you yourself will read the book which contains this story.

    Dictionary Information: Definition Yourself - Description Meaning Thesaurus
    _____________

    Singular subject: A group is ...
    Plural subject: Students are ...
    Hi Casiopea
    Far from me the idea of contradicting you, but how can you explain the following , please.

    A number of students are .........-rule of proximity [students - subject ; a number of -attribute]
    The number of students is... - number is the subject of the sentence.
    Doesn`t this rule apply to "a group of students are...", as well ?
    students- subject of the sentence [ students do the action ]
    a group of - attribute


    Subjects preceded by the number of or the percentage of are singular, while subjects preceded by a number of or a percentage of are plural.

    Example: The number of vacationers in Florida is increasing.
    Example: A number of vacationers are young people. However, a large percentage of the vacationers are senior citizens.
    Subject-Verb Agreement
    Thank you very much in advance.
    Last edited by Teia; 15-Aug-2007 at 13:46.

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    Default Re: Reflexive pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Hi Casiopea
    Far from me the idea of contradicting you, but how can you explain the following, please.
    But your examples haven't contradicted mine; moreover, there's really no need for me to explain what you have already explained.

    ____________
    This phrase far from me the idea of contradicting you is new to me. Could you tell me where you learned it. I'm interested in its origin and common usage.

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    BobK's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reflexive pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    ...
    This phrase far from me the idea of contradicting you is new to me. Could you tell me where you learned it. I'm interested in its origin and common usage.
    Perhaps it's a misremembered form of 'Far be it from me to ...'.

    Returning to the thread (specifically its title), although 'yourself' is reflexive in form, it isn't reflexive in function (in this context). It is reflexive in function in 'I don't want you to read aloud; read to yourself' or 'I'll read you a bed-time story until your 7th birthday; after that, you must read to yourself'.

    b

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    Teia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Reflexive pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    But your examples haven't contradicted mine; moreover, there's really no need for me to explain what you have already explained.

    ____________
    This phrase far from me the idea of contradicting you is new to me. Could you tell me where you learned it. I'm interested in its origin and common usage.
    Hi Casiopea.

    I have just invented it . I`m sorry but I don`t know how to say that it is far from me the idea to contradict you [I mean : I don`t like to contradict smb.especially when I know that they are experts in English ] Should I say : Far be it from me...?
    origin: Romanian thinking when translating into English = RomEnglish mixture

    Sorry. I`ve been studying English for many years but I still make stupid mistakes!
    Last edited by Teia; 15-Aug-2007 at 17:18.

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    Default Re: Reflexive pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    I have just invented it . I`m sorry but I don`t know how to say that it is far from me the idea to contradict you [I mean : I don`t like to contradict smb.especially when I know that they are experts in English ] Should I say : Far be it from me...?
    origin: Romanian thinking when translating into English = RomEnglish mixture
    Well, I kind of like it.

    Try this,
    Far be it from me to contradict you, but ...
    It's polite, or at least traditionally it was taken that way. It was a way of humbling oneself; i.e., I do not wish to interrupt, critize, or complain, but ...

    I'm not sure it's all that common these days. Well, at least in North American English. It's not that people don't use it, some do, but the pedantic types, you know.

    Anyway, if you want a similar phrase, one that reflects the modern you, try something like,
    My intention isn't to ....
    I don't mean to ...
    Hope that helps.

  8. #8
    BobK's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reflexive pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    ...
    Anyway, if you want a similar phrase, one that reflects the modern you, try something like,
    My intention isn't to ....
    I don't mean to ...
    Hope that helps.
    ... or, if you really think they're wrong, you could prefix your remarks with "With all due respect,...". This expression can be a bit tricky though. I remember a classmate using it to a teacher once - about 40 years ago - and getting very short shrift.

    b

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    Default Re: Reflexive pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    ... or, if you really think they're wrong, you could prefix your remarks with "With all due respect,...". This expression can be a bit tricky though. I remember a classmate using it to a teacher once - about 40 years ago - and getting very short shrift.

    b
    I've experienced that too--not personally though. The teacher's assumption being, possibly, in what way is contradicting an authority respectful?

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    Default Re: Reflexive pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    Well, I kind of like it.

    Try this,
    Far be it from me to contradict you, but ...
    It's polite, or at least traditionally it was taken that way. It was a way of humbling oneself; i.e., I do not wish to interrupt, critize, or complain, but ...

    I'm not sure it's all that common these days. Well, at least in North American English. It's not that people don't use it, some do, but the pedantic types, you know.

    Anyway, if you want a similar phrase, one that reflects the modern you, try something like,
    My intention isn't to ....
    I don't mean to ...
    Hope that helps.
    Thank you very much. I appreciate your help.

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