Results 1 to 5 of 5

    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 1,740
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    food left over/ food over

    When all the guests had gone, we realized there was lots of food left over.
    When all the guests had gone, we realized there was lots of food over.

    Which one of these sentences is correct?

    If both are correct, what will be the difference in the meaning between these sentences?


    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 29
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: food left over/ food over

    ...there was a lot of food leftovers.
    or
    ...there were lots of food leftovers.



    ...there was lots of food over ---I'd say this one is incorrect




    I am not a native speaker, but a lot of... is singular, and lots of... is plural. And the word leftovers is one word, not two.


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 1,740
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: food left over/ food over

    Thank you Marseeprint.
    But this sentence is from the Cambridge dictionary.

    See here : Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 1,885
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: food left over/ food over

    Quote Originally Posted by user_gary View Post
    When all the guests had gone, we realized there was lots of food left over.
    When all the guests had gone, we realized there was lots of food over.

    Which one of these sentences is correct?

    If both are correct, what will be the difference in the meaning between these sentences?

    leftovers

    plural noun
    food remaining after a meal:
    e.g. This recipe can serve four easily, and the leftovers are just as good eaten cold.

    When all the guests had gone, we realized there was lots of / a lot of leftovers.

    leftover
    adjective [before noun]
    describes part of something that has not been used or eaten when the other parts have been:
    some leftover curry from last night's meal

    When all the guests had gone, we realized there was a lot of /lots of leftover food
    Last edited by Teia; 15-Aug-2007 at 12:52.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 1,885
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: food left over/ food over

    A lot of and lots of are used with either plural or singular nouns.

    "lots of" vs. "a lot of" (English translation glossary) Linguistics,Art/Literary

    Casiopea
    ( English teacher ) a lot of and lots of , which carry the same basic meaning: a great deal of, are colloquial (i.e., informal) but nonetheless Standard and acceptable. lots of is considered more informal than a lot of.

    There's no rule on usage: Both a lot of and lots of are used with plural count nouns and non-count nouns, like this,

    Plural Count Noun
    There are a lot of books in your bag. (OK)
    There are lots of books in you bag. (OK)

    Non-Count Noun
    There is a lot of milk left in your glass. (OK)
    There is lots of milk left in your glass. (OK)

    In terms of grammar, the verb agrees in number with the noun: if the noun is plural then the verb is plural,

    A lot of books were left on the table.
    Lots of books were left on the table.

    if the noun is not plural, then the verb is not plural,

    A lot of milk was left on the table.
    Lots of milk was left on the table.

    In academic writing, the more formal 'a great deal of' or 'many', with plural count nouns, and 'a great deal of' or 'much', with non-count nouns are used:

    Plural Count Noun
    There are a great deal of books in your bag.
    A great deal of books are in your bag.

    Non-Count Noun
    There is a great deal of milk left in your glass.
    A great deal of milk is left in your glass.

    In terms of meaning, speakers tend not to make a distinction between a lot of and lots of; both refer to a great quantity. But, for some speakers, lots of tends to mean, more than a lot of (i.e., a greater quantity).

    Questions and Answers - Learn English by asking good English questions

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 22-Apr-2007, 07:45
  2. 6 - food, eating
    By Lenka in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 18-Mar-2006, 12:44
  3. food shortage vs. food shortageS
    By peteryoung in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Jul-2005, 06:31
  4. SURVEY: How do you think of GM food?
    By whisper in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 14-Sep-2004, 14:56
  5. wrapping up the left food
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Aug-2004, 04:31

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •