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  1. #1
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    Default Email:[C] or [U]?

    Is this correct?

    I received six emails today.
    Last edited by hdrao; 21-Aug-2007 at 05:45.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Email:[C] or [U]?

    Seems fine to me.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Email:[C] or [U]?

    an e-mail message, but not an e-mail.

    --The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage,
    Allan M. Siegal and William G. Connolly, 1999

    (e-mail messages, but not e-mails)

  4. #4
    engee30's Avatar
    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Email:[C] or [U]?

    Quote Originally Posted by hdrao View Post
    an e-mail message, but not an e-mail.

    --The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage,
    Allan M. Siegal and William G. Connolly, 1999

    (e-mail messages, but not e-mails)
    Everything's fine.
    Check this out: Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Email:[C] or [U]?

    In British English, there seems to be no problem at all with the plural. I have, however, seen some conservative American arguing that it should not be used in the plural because 'mail' is uncountable, though many ignore this.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Email:[C] or [U]?

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    But dictionaries are descriptive, not prescriptive.

  7. #7
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    Smile Re: Email:[C] or [U]?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    In British English, there seems to be no problem at all with the plural. I have, however, seen some conservative American arguing that it should not be used in the plural because 'mail' is uncountable, though many ignore this.
    Yes, I agree with you.
    The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage, especially a 1999 edition, has a very distinctive style that in some cases is more suited to a newspaper format and in some cases is just quirky. For example, they don’t use serial comma, whereas almost all U.S. book publishers (and many other newspapers/magazines) do. In fact, from reading The New York Times, I believe someone there needs to find a new style manual
    We’re discussing style from the standpoint of the general population; the majority of e-mail users refer to sending an “e-mail”, NOT and “e-mail message”. Doing so would probably seem redundant or wordy to the general English speaker.

  8. #8
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Email:[C] or [U]?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    In British English, there seems to be no problem at all with the plural. I have, however, seen some conservative American arguing that it should not be used in the plural because 'mail' is uncountable, though many ignore this.
    When I was working in a US-based IT firm, this argument had a strange corollary:
    • mail is uncountable
    • but people often use 'e-mail' as countable
    • so if someone says 'I received a mail' it probably means 'I received an e-mail'.
    As a result, any countable use of 'mail' was assumed to refer to e-mail; in fact, in the '80s - when I started working there - it was most unusual for anyone to say 'e-mail'. And 'mail', unusually to my (then) ear, was often countable.

    b

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