Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: questions

  1. Anonymous
    Guest
    #1

    questions

    1. " Seems to me you are asking can be fudge the law for "every"
    emotional case of illegal immigrants?"

    2. " You can fudge on many things except your education."

    would you check two sentences above?

    3. what is the difference between "fudge" and "cheat"?

    Thanks in advance :)

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 19,257
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Jia Ping
    1. " Seems to me you are asking can be fudge the law for "every"
    emotional case of illegal immigrants?"

    2. " You can fudge on many things except your education."

    would you check two sentences above?

    3. what is the difference between "fudge" and "cheat"?

    Thanks in advance :)
    "Fudge" can mean cheat. At other times, it refers to stretching a little bit over the line of what is proper -- a milder form of cheating.

  3. pasiree
    Guest
    #3

    Re: questions

    Thanks for your answer MikeNewYork


    " Seems to me you are asking can be fudge the law for "every"
    emotional case of illegal immigrants?"

    Could you correct this sentence?






    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by Jia Ping
    1. " Seems to me you are asking can be fudge the law for "every"
    emotional case of illegal immigrants?"

    2. " You can fudge on many things except your education."

    would you check two sentences above?

    3. what is the difference between "fudge" and "cheat"?

    Thanks in advance :)
    "Fudge" can mean cheat. At other times, it refers to stretching a little bit over the line of what is proper -- a milder form of cheating.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 67
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: questions

    Quote Originally Posted by pasiree
    Thanks for your answer MikeNewYork


    " Seems to me you are asking can be fudge the law for "every"
    emotional case of illegal immigrants?"

    Could you correct this sentence?






    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by Jia Ping
    1. " Seems to me you are asking can be fudge the law for "every"
    emotional case of illegal immigrants?"

    2. " You can fudge on many things except your education."

    would you check two sentences above?

    3. what is the difference between "fudge" and "cheat"?

    Thanks in advance :)
    "Fudge" can mean cheat. At other times, it refers to stretching a little bit over the line of what is proper -- a milder form of cheating.
    Try:
    Seems to me you are asking if the law can be fudged for "every" emotional case of illegal immigrants

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 45,954
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: questions

    Quote Originally Posted by pasiree
    " Seems to me you are asking can be fudge the law for "every"
    emotional case of illegal immigrants?"
    "It seems to me that asking whether the law can be fudged for "every"
    emotional case of illegal immigration?"


  4. pasiree
    Guest
    #6

    Re: questions

    Sorry to bother you again.
    I should say:

    " I myself never support people in giving up their own lives "

    or

    " I myself never support people to give up their own lives "

    Which one is correct?



    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Quote Originally Posted by pasiree
    " Seems to me you are asking can be fudge the law for "every"
    emotional case of illegal immigrants?"
    "It seems to me that asking whether the law can be fudged for "every"
    emotional case of illegal immigration?"


    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 45,954
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7
    I'd say you could use both, the first would be involvement at some stage, and the first would be involvement from the beginningof the action. However, I'm not sure what you mean by 'giving up lives'.

  5. pasiree
    Guest
    #8
    Thanks a lot tdol :)

    I'm afraid that I have questions to ask you again

    1. the following statement should have been:

    " I now realize you cannot explain to me how is this relevant to our discussion."

    or

    " I now realize you cannot explain to me how this is relevant to our discussion."

    Could you please suggest me?

    2.
    " I'm not sure what you mean by 'giving up lives' "

    I mean "scrifice".
    Is the meaning of “give up life" and "sacrifice life" alike?

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 45,954
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9
    "I now realize you cannot explain to me how this is relevant to our discussion."
    This is correct, because you are not asking that question, but talking about it.

    'Sacrifice' a life means dying that others might live. 'Giving up' could imply losing the willto life as well.

  6. pasiree
    Guest
    #10
    Hi tdol,

    another one :(

    " I'm unsure what are you getting at " or "I'm unsure what you are getting at "

    I believe the second one is correct. am I right?

    could you tell me what subjects of grammatical use can explain about this problem? I'm quite confused.


    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    "I now realize you cannot explain to me how this is relevant to our discussion."
    This is correct, because you are not asking that question, but talking about it.

    'Sacrifice' a life means dying that others might live. 'Giving up' could imply losing the willto life as well.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. A newbie with usage questions
    By Francois in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 30-Jan-2007, 10:41
  2. questions - have to/must, article, mistakes
    By Lenka in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 25-Sep-2004, 07:32
  3. questions from "Friends" script
    By welldone in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 03-Jul-2004, 19:32
  4. Answering questions
    By dduck in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-Sep-2003, 23:57

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •