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Thread: confusion

  1. #1
    MIA6 is offline Junior Member
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    Default confusion

    1. He agreed Monday to plead guilty to dogfighting charges. What does 'plead... to' mean here?

    2. I think 'less' is already the comparative form of 'little', so where 'lesser' comes from?

    3. What's the difference between 'two days before' and 'two days ago'?

    4. Which way leads US now? Or Which way does it lead US now? I forgot when should use 'do'/'does' in a question and when I don't have to.

    thanks a lot for helping.

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by MIA6 View Post
    1. He agreed Monday to plead guilty to dogfighting charges. What does 'plead... to' mean here?

    2. I think 'less' is already the comparative form of 'little', so where 'lesser' comes from?

    3. What's the difference between 'two days before' and 'two days ago'?

    4. Which way leads US now? Or Which way does it lead US now? I forgot when should use 'do'/'does' in a question and when I don't have to.

    thanks a lot for helping.
    1 Not all judicial systems have the notion of 'pleading'. Maybe yours doesn't. The US and UK legal systems do, but many European ones don't. A 'plea' is entered at the beginning of a criminal trial: 'Guilty' [='I did it'] or 'Not guilty' [= 'You can't prove I did it'.

    2 If maths can have a 'second derivative', why can't language? If X, Y, and Z are 'bad', 'worse' and 'worst', Z is still worse than X - but it is worse to a greater extent than Y; Y is 'the lesser of the two evils'.

    3 'Ago' is meaningful in a context where 'now' has a meaning - typically in direct speech (though also in, for example, journalism'. So '"I did it two weeks ago", she said' but 'She said she had done it two weeks before their conversation.'. And if it's the conversation that took place two weeks ago - 'We're seeing the customer tomorrow, and she still hasn't written that report. She told me two weeks ago that she would do it before the meeting.'

    4 'Where is the US going?'

    b

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