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  1. #1
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    Default Nibble around the edges

    Hello, could you please indicate what "nibble around the edges" means?
    Thank You!

    Regards
    Cmp

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Nibble around the edges

    I dont know, what means: "Nibble around the edges"
    But I know a sentences with nibble: "The bread had been nibbled by mice"
    :)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Nibble around the edges

    cmp, context is always helpful.

    I would understand this to mean the person did not address the real issue or take on the big problem, but just did little things that didn't really make much of a difference.

    If you picture solving a big problem as eating a big sandwich, but all you do it take tiny bites of the bread's crust and never really eat the sandwich, you have nibbled around the edges of the problem without really doing much.

    Of course, you could be talking about a real piece of cheese left on the ground and the mice have nibbled around the edges. So, again, context is key.

    [a business writer, not a teacher]

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Nibble around the edges

    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyka View Post
    I dont know, what means: "Nibble around the edges"
    But I know a sentences with nibble: "The bread had been nibbled by mice"
    :)
    This idiom does come from eating. "nibble" means to take tiny bites of food. Instead of taking a big bite of a sandwich, for example, a child may take tiny bites from the edges of the sandwich. (nibble around the edges)

    The idiom means not attacking a problem or task directly and forcefully, but just doing small things on the surface of the problem or task.

    'The proposed solution to the health care crisis is just nibbling around the edges.' This means that the proposed solution will not address and fix the major causes of the problem, it will just make some minor improvements.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Nibble around the edges

    I found that sentence in my dictonary:)

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