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  1. #1
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    Default sentence meaning

    Computer employment is rising again since 1999. <--does this sentence make sense? if so, what does it mean? The bold part is the part i dont really get.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    'Since 1999' doesn't go with 'is rising', which carries no dense of the past, just the present. I'd use 'has risen' or 'has been rising' there.

  3. #3
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    "Not leaving, I will be working at this job." <--meaning?
    "Not leaving, I will be working for this job." <--meaning?

  4. #4
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    I can't say that I like either. 'Work at' would be do the job. 'Work for' means try to achieve, in this case to get the job.

  5. #5
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    "All the times we had together." <--what does this sentence mean?

    "All the times we have together." <--what does this sentence mean?

  6. #6
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    Let me see what you get. <--correct?
    Let me see what you got. <--correct?
    Let me see what you have. <--correct?
    Let me see what you had. <--correct?

    What does each one of these sentences mean?

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    There all correct- the difference is time. The first refers to somethingin the future, the second and fourth to the past and the third either to the present or the future.

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