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  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #21

    Re: Married or otherwise?

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by henry
    'Don't leave me in a lurch' is a correct usage.

    'grind rice into flour' is a direct translation by Cas, and I find it quite funny.

    Hope I don't let you down. :wink:

    Not at all. Henry, thank you very much indeed.

    I know the literal meaning of "grind rice into flour". I was wondering if it would probably has metaphorical reference which might be considered as "Thanks" or something, written as a reply to Mike's previous post "Excellent answer!". Now,I got you. It's merely a direct literal translation.

    Thanks again.
    It must be an idiom. I don't get it either, but I'm honored! :wink:

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #22

    Re: Married or otherwise?

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by henry
    'Don't leave me in a lurch' is a correct usage.

    'grind rice into flour' is a direct translation by Cas, and I find it quite funny.

    Hope I don't let you down. :wink:

    Not at all. Henry, thank you very much indeed.

    I know the literal meaning of "grind rice into flour". I was wondering if it would probably has metaphorical reference which might be considered as "Thanks" or something, written as a reply to Mike's previous post "Excellent answer!". Now,I got you. It's merely a direct literal translation.

    Thanks again.
    Saying, Gomasuri is a way of making light of or shrugging off a strong compliment so as not to appear boastful. In the USA, it is used in a different way. Gomasuri means to brown nose and in the UK it means to apple polish.

    When one grinds rough kernels of rice into soft, smooth flour, one turns what's rough, unpleasant, and unpalatable into something that's soft, pleasant and palatable.

    I was thanking Mike for his comment in a witty way. :wink:

  3. Susie Smith
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    #23

    Re: Married or otherwise?

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by henry
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by henry
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Gomasuri
    Hi Cas,

    What is ' Gomasuri'?
    It's an honorific term used by Japanese speakers. It means, grind rice into flour. :wink:
    Oh, I get it. What a nice saying! 8)

    I don't get it. Don't leave me in a lurch. ( Is it a correct usage?)
    If you leave somebody in the lurch, it means that you desert the person when he or she needs help.
    :wink:


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #24
    Susan, thank you very much indeed.

    The reason why I used this idiom "Don't leave me in the lurch" was because, at first, Henry asked Cas what did it mean. After Cas' reply, I still didn't get it. I looked this idiom up in my ALL KINDS of dictionaries, and Google of course ( Thank Google, they had 19,000 results), and it turned out to be no answer. Then I felt frustated.

    Therefore I used this idiom to express that I met some difficulties there, and somebody might do me a favour. And I want to know if my usage of this idiom is suitable in this context.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #25

    Re: Married or otherwise?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Saying, Gomasuri is a way of making light of or shrugging off a strong compliment so as not to appear boastful. In the USA, it is used in a different way. Gomasuri means to brown nose and in the UK it means to apple polish.

    When one grinds rough kernels of rice into soft, smooth flour, one turns what's rough, unpleasant, and unpalatable into something that's soft, pleasant and palatable.

    I was thanking Mike for his comment in a witty way. :wink:
    Thanks for the explanation, and the compliment. :D

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #26

    Re: Married or otherwise?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Saying, Gomasuri is a way of making light of or shrugging off a strong compliment so as not to appear boastful. In the USA, it is used in a different way. Gomasuri means to brown nose and in the UK it means to apple polish.

    When one grinds rough kernels of rice into soft, smooth flour, one turns what's rough, unpleasant, and unpalatable into something that's soft, pleasant and palatable.

    I was thanking Mike for his comment in a witty way. :wink:
    Thanks for the explanation, and the compliment. :D
    I'm even more embarrassed in having had to explain it

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #27

    Re: Married or otherwise?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Saying, Gomasuri is a way of making light of or shrugging off a strong compliment so as not to appear boastful. In the USA, it is used in a different way. Gomasuri means to brown nose and in the UK it means to apple polish.

    When one grinds rough kernels of rice into soft, smooth flour, one turns what's rough, unpleasant, and unpalatable into something that's soft, pleasant and palatable.

    I was thanking Mike for his comment in a witty way. :wink:
    Thanks for the explanation, and the compliment. :D
    I'm even more embarrassed in having had to explain it

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