Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default What's the meaning of the two sentences

    1.The china was not nearly as good as it was old.
    2.The china was not nearly as good as it was .


    What's the meaning of the two sentences? Are there any diffferences in meaning?

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    16,291
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What's the meaning of the two sentences

    1. The china (the dishes) was quite old, but it wasn't of very good quality.

    2. Something is missing from the end of this sentence. It doesn't make sense as it is written.

    [business writer, not teacher]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What's the meaning of the two sentences

    My irreplaceable treasure

    [1]Recently I gave a dinner party for some close friends. To add a touch of elegance to the evening, I brought out the good stuff--my white Royal Crown Derby china with the fine blue-and-gold border. When we were seated, one of the guests noticed the beat-up gravy boat I'd placed among the newer, better dinnerware. "Is it an heirloom?" she asked tactfully.

    [2] I admit the piece does look rather conspicuous. For one thing, it matches nothing else. It's also old and chipped. But that little gravy boat is much more than an heirloom to me. It is the one thing in this world I will never part with.

    [3] The story begins more than 50 years ago, when I was seven years old and we lived in a big house along the Ohio River in New Richmond, Ohio. All that separated the house from the river was the street and our wide front lawn. In anticipation of high water, the ground floor had been built seven feet above grade.

    [4] Late in December the heavy rains came, and the river climbed to the tops of its banks. When the water began to rise in a serious way, my parents made plans in case the river should invade our house. My mother decided she would pack our books and her fine china in a small den off the master bedroom.

    [5] ******The china was not nearly as good as it was old. ******Each piece had a gold rim and a band of roses. But the service had been her mother's and was precious to her. As she packed the china with great care, she said to me, "You must treasure the things that people you love have cherished. It keeps you in touch with them."


    From the context I don't think the first sentence suggests that the china was very old, but it was not very good. It seems to say the china is good. Am I right?

    Can we change the 2nd sentence into: The china was not nearly good as it was.?

    Thanks a lot!

  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    16,291
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What's the meaning of the two sentences

    You will have to get another opinion, then, because even with this context, I will repeat my original comment.

    It says the china was old - at least a little old - but not "fine china."

    The china was not nearly as good as it was is not a complete sentence and cannot be used to replace the one in the original text.

    [a writer, not a teacher]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    58
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What's the meaning of the two sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by vaok View Post
    My irreplaceable treasure

    [1]Recently I gave a dinner party for some close friends. To add a touch of elegance to the evening, I brought out the good stuff--my white Royal Crown Derby china with the fine blue-and-gold border. When we were seated, one of the guests noticed the beat-up gravy boat I'd placed among the newer, better dinnerware. "Is it an heirloom?" she asked tactfully.

    [2] I admit the piece does look rather conspicuous. For one thing, it matches nothing else. It's also old and chipped. But that little gravy boat is much more than an heirloom to me. It is the one thing in this world I will never part with.

    [3] The story begins more than 50 years ago, when I was seven years old and we lived in a big house along the Ohio River in New Richmond, Ohio. All that separated the house from the river was the street and our wide front lawn. In anticipation of high water, the ground floor had been built seven feet above grade.

    [4] Late in December the heavy rains came, and the river climbed to the tops of its banks. When the water began to rise in a serious way, my parents made plans in case the river should invade our house. My mother decided she would pack our books and her fine china in a small den off the master bedroom.

    [5] ******The china was not nearly as good as it was old. ******Each piece had a gold rim and a band of roses. But the service had been her mother's and was precious to her. As she packed the china with great care, she said to me, "You must treasure the things that people you love have cherished. It keeps you in touch with them."


    From the context I don't think the first sentence suggests that the china was very old, but it was not very good. It seems to say the china is good. Am I right?

    Can we change the 2nd sentence into: The china was not nearly good as it was.?

    Thanks a lot!
    It does mean that the china was really old but was not good, fine china.

    The second sentence, I think, can be changed into:
    The china was not nearly (as) good as it was old.

    NOT A TEACHER

  6. #6
    magimagicE is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What's the meaning of the two sentences

    The china was not nearly as good as it was old and worn.


    The author/narrator is making a comparison between her own set of china with the set of china (the heirloom) left to her by her mother.

    The heirloom is in poor condition but she treasures it, nevertheless, as it holds sentimental value to her.

  7. #7
    tedtmc is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Malaysia
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,130
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What's the meaning of the two sentences

    1.The china was not nearly as good as it was old.

    The value of the china lies in its age, not so much its quality.

    2.The china was not nearly as good as it was (before) .

    It is comparing the china produced now compared to the china produced previously.

    not a teacher

Similar Threads

  1. meaning of sentences
    By kohyoongliat in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-Aug-2007, 21:13
  2. Difference in meaning between sentences
    By kohyoongliat in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 13-Jun-2007, 01:21
  3. Difference in meaning between sentences
    By kohyoongliat in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-May-2007, 15:52
  4. meaning and usage of some sentences
    By negar_aghili in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Sep-2005, 12:17
  5. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-Sep-2005, 14:36

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk