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  1. blouen's Avatar
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    #1

    explaining proverb

    How do I explain what a proverb is? (to someone who cannot understand English very well)

    * A proverb is a saying that gives advice which is generally accepted as true. It is usually a short sentence that is quite understandable to everyone for it based on common sense and experience. They usually give advice and wisdom. For example: ¨Little learning is a dangerous thing.¨ and ¨Don´t count your chickens before they hatch.¨


    * Could you kindly give comments on this and corrections too. Thanks!

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: explaining proverb

    Instead of defining what a proverb is, you could give an example of a proverb by drawing on the learner's knowledge. Every language has proverbs: Proverbs and quotations about language in many languages

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: explaining proverb

    Quote Originally Posted by blouen View Post
    How do I explain what a proverb is? (to someone who cannot understand English very well)

    * A proverb is a saying that gives advice which is generally accepted as true. It is usually a short sentence that is quite understandable to everyone for it based on common sense and experience. They usually give advice and wisdom. For example: ¨Little learning is a dangerous thing.¨ and ¨Don´t count your chickens before they hatch.¨


    * Could you kindly give comments on this and corrections too. Thanks!
    They often use old words and/or syntax, fossilized; and they often refer to a social/domestic context that no longer applies. For example 'Let not the pot call the kettle black' or 'Least said soonest mended' or 'Fine words butter no parsnips' or 'Faint heart never won fair lady' or 'Cast ne'er a clout before May be out' or ....

    b


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    #4

    Re: explaining proverb

    If you know the word for it in the learner's language, then use it.
    Time is precious.

  4. blouen's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: explaining proverb

    Thanks for the advice guys. But I guess, they still won´t understand even if I give the meaning, so giving an example would be better. Sadly, it will also consume much time to explain the meaning to them for I´m pretty sure, they won´t get it that easily.


    Does anybody know what proverb is in Korean?

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    #6

    Re: explaining proverb

    Hello Blouen,

    A slight adjustment:

    1. A little learning is a dangerous thing.

    This is a line by Alexander Pope. It belongs to that interesting class of "proverbs" that are not anonymous folk sayings, but quotations from literary works, which have passed into everyday English.

    Other examples from Pope are:

    2. Hope springs eternal in the human breast.
    3. Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

    MrP

  5. blouen's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: explaining proverb

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic View Post
    Hello Blouen,

    A slight adjustment:

    1. A little learning is a dangerous thing.

    This is a line by Alexander Pope. It belongs to that interesting class of "proverbs" that are not anonymous folk sayings, but quotations from literary works, which have passed into everyday English.

    Other examples from Pope are:

    2. Hope springs eternal in the human breast.
    3. Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

    MrP
    Thanks MrP!

    Your first example was the example I gave my student and, whew, it got me a hard time explaining to her that she would understand. First, the meaning of proverb, next the meaning of that proverb.

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