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Thread: at this time


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    #1

    at this time

    Hi,

    Paul will be singing here at this time tomorrow.

    1. What does 'at this time' mean?
    2. Is 'time' a countable noun here?
    3. Does it matter at what time the speaker says this?

    Thanks,


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    #2

    Re: at this time

    [CAUTION: I am not a teacher:take the advice and or corrections offered in this post at your own risk.
    If you doubt the information, please get a qualified opinion from one of the teachers on these forums.]

    One crucial word has been omitted:"...at this same time tomorrow", as it often is because this expression is already understood to mean "at this (same) time".

    The speaker is probably referring to a time, as referenced by a clock (say, two o'clock) or could also be referring to a more general time(as in "break-time").

    Time, in the sense of time of day, as in hours and minutes, is never countable. Do not be confused by something like: "at three separate times during the day". This refers to events, which happen to be measured by time of day (or not:dawn,noon and dusk for example)

    "Times" refers to the number of incidents of an occurence or action. (He tapped three times) or the more general sense with which we refer to "changing times". As in the magazine "Times" and the public square "Times", neither of which, in my private opinion, make much sense (imagine a magazine called "Peoples"). Their notorious omission of "the", or any definitive article may have contributed to your confusion.
    Last edited by weiming; 03-Sep-2007 at 07:26.


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    #3

    Re: at this time

    Quote Originally Posted by Nefertiti View Post
    Hi,

    Paul will be singing here at this time tomorrow.

    1. What does 'at this time' mean?
    2. Is 'time' a countable noun here?
    3. Does it matter at what time the speaker says this?

    Thanks,
    #1 the same time tomorrow as today
    #2 No
    #3 No - the time is irrelevant.


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    #4

    Re: at this time

    Thanks, both of you.

    Let me elaborate more to see if I really get it.


    e.g. Paul McCartney is starting a 3-day show. He is making a performance at Cow Palace tonight ( 8 - 10 p.m.) (today's date: September 03, 2007)

    1. Is it Okay to say, "Paul will be singing there at this time tomorrow," which means he will be singing there on September 04, 2007 from 8 to 10) ?

    2. Does it matter if I'm saying this at 2:20 p.m. on September 03, 2007? Through your explanations, I guess not. Correct? (In case, I am the speaker.)

    Thanks again.

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    #5

    Re: at this time

    When you say "at this time" you mean the same time it is right now.

    If it's 2:30 and you say "at this time tomorrow" then tomorrow he will sing at 2:30.

    If it's 2:30 and you say "He's singing tonight at 8" and then the person asks you about tomorrow, and you say "At the same time tomorrow" then tomorrow he is singing at 8.

    [not a teacher]


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    #6

    Re: at this time

    [CAUTION: I am not a teacher:take the advice and or corrections offered in this post at your own risk.
    If you doubt the information, please get a qualified opinion from one of the teachers on these forums.]


    Quote Originally Posted by Nefertiti View Post
    Hi,

    Paul will be singing here at this time tomorrow.
    ...
    3. Does it matter at what time the speaker says this?

    Thanks,
    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    ...
    #3 No - the time is irrelevant.
    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    When you say "at this time" you mean the same time it is right now*.

    If it's 2:30 and you say "at this time tomorrow" then tomorrow he will sing at 2:30.
    ...
    [not a teacher]

    *"right now" probably means, at the time the speaker utters the sentence.

    Anglika,

    How do you arrive at the conclusion that the time is immaterial?


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    #7

    Re: at this time

    I am getting a clearer picture. Let's wait and see what Anglika is going to say.

    Thanks for the help.

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