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Thread: time clause

  1. #1
    ambreen Guest

    time clause

    please teel me can we make time clause in presant simple tens

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
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    Re: time clause

    "When I go to London tomorrow I will take the train." [Not "when I will go..."].

    b

  3. #3
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    Wink Re: time clause

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    "When I go to London tomorrow I will take the train." [Not "when I will go..."].

    b
    But one should be aware of a possible (and correct at once) situation like the following:

    I don't know when I will go to London. (Maybe next month.)

  4. #4
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    Re: time clause

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    But one should be aware of a possible (and correct at once) situation like the following:

    I don't know when I will go to London. (Maybe next month.)
    Use the present simple in clauses introduced by when, as soon as, until, after, before and while.

    In time clauses, we can`t use future tense, but present tense [or, present perfect- it depends on the situation]:

    I don`t know when I go to London.

    You may also need to use the present perfect in some cases when you need to show that one action can only take place after another has been completed:

    e.g.As soon as I've done my homework, I`ll go out / I`m going to watch TV., etc

  5. #5
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    Wink Re: time clause

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    Use the present simple in clauses introduced by when, as soon as, until, after, before and while.

    In time clauses, we can`t use future tense, but present tense [or, present perfect- it depends on the situation]:

    I don`t know when I go to London.

    You may also need to use the present perfect in some cases when you need to show that one action can only take place after another has been completed:

    e.g.As soon as I've done my homework, I`ll go out / I`m going to watch TV., etc
    Let me try to explain something.

    A: So, Jules, when are you going to London? Next week maybe?
    B: I don't know, Andy, but I'll let you know when I will go there.

    Jules will inform Andy about the time/date of his (i.e. Jules's) going to London some time in the future.

    A: So, Jules, what about your going to London next week? Are you going alone, or with your boss?
    B: I don't know, Andy, but I'll let you know when I go there.

    Jules will tell Andy about whether or not he's going to London alone the moment he goes there, or just before his departure.

    I am hoping this is something that reads easily and clearly.
    That's the difference!

  6. #6
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    Re: time clause

    Hi Engee

    Thank you for your explanation; still, it does not work:

    No Future in Time Clauses
    Like all future forms, the Simple Future cannot be used in clauses beginning with time expressions such as: when, while, before, after, by the time, as soon as, if, unless, etc. Instead of Simple Future, Simple Present is used.

    Examples:

    When you will arrive tonight, we will go out for dinner. Not Correct
    When you arrive tonight, we will go out for dinner. Correct


    ENGLISH PAGE - Simple Future
    Exceptions.
    a. The rule does not apply to "when" as a question word.

    When will you be home from work tonight?
    When is Cheryl going to buy the car she likes so much?

    b. The rule does not apply to "when" or "if" when they introduce an indirect question. (In these sentences, "whether" can replace "if".)

    No one knows when an earthquake will occur.
    I didn't know if I would feel like eating that early.
    We needed to find out if George would help us.

    c. The rule is relaxed after "before" in certain idiomatic expressions of will, i.e., willingness or willfulness -- expressions which combine volition with futurity. Note that there is sometimes a shade of exasperation expressed by the speaker. Both elements of the pairs shown are acceptable (in my opinion) in casual speech.

    I've finally stopped the children from fighting,
    but it won't be long before they'll be at it again.
    but it won't be long before they're at it again.

    Janice got in a car accident when she ran a red light.
    It will be a long while before she'll try that again.
    It will be a long while before she tries that again.

    Ken gave me very bad advice,
    but it was a long time before he would admit he was wrong.
    but it was a long time before he admitted he was wrong.

    It will be a cold day before I'll let my daughter marry that man!
    It will be a cold day before I let my daughter marry that man!

    "No future tense in time clause"
    Last edited by Teia; 11-Sep-2007 at 10:41.

  7. #7
    BobK's Avatar
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    Re: time clause

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    ...
    In time clauses, we can`t use future tense, but present tense [or, present perfect- it depends on the situation]:

    I don`t know when I go to London.
    - engee30's example sounds fine to me. There's a question about whether it's a time clause in the sense we're discussing (a clause that the timing of another verb depends on), but the example holds good - the string of words '...when I will...' is possible (but only in cases like that).

    Quote Originally Posted by teia_petrescu View Post
    You may also need to use the present perfect in some cases when you need to show that one action can only take place after another has been completed:

    e.g.As soon as I've done my homework, I`ll go out / I`m going to watch TV., etc
    Good point.

    b

  8. #8
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    Re: time clause

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    Let me try to explain something.

    A: So, Jules, when are you going to London? Next week maybe?
    B: I don't know, Andy, but I'll let you know when I will go there.

    Jules will inform Andy about the time/date of his (i.e. Jules's) going to London some time in the future.

    A: So, Jules, what about your going to London next week? Are you going alone, or with your boss?
    B: I don't know, Andy, but I'll let you know when I go there.

    Jules will tell Andy about whether or not he's going to London alone the moment he goes there, or just before his departure.

    I am hoping this is something that reads easily and clearly.
    That's the difference!
    I don't know, Andy, but I'll let you know when I will go there.[/I] :
    You can use another type of clause or a future equivalent:

    I don't know, Andy, but I'll let you know if I go there.[/I], or
    I don`t know......when / if I am planning to go / am going there.

  9. #9
    Teia is offline Key Member
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    Re: time clause

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    - engee30's example sounds fine to me. There's a question about whether it's a time clause in the sense we're discussing (a clause that the timing of another verb depends on), but the example holds good - the string of words '...when I will...' is possible (but only in cases like that).



    Good point.

    b
    Right! This clause sounds rather conditional. It should read as I`ve previously mentioned : if I go there / in case I go there.
    Last edited by Teia; 11-Sep-2007 at 17:52.

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