Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 40

Thread: next, after

  1. #1
    Nefertiti is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    383
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default next, after

    Hi, there.

    I was waiting in line. A lady in front of me was getting served.

    Was it Okay to tell the staff who worked there,

    "I'm the next"?
    "I'm next"?
    "I'm next to her"?
    "I'm after her"?
    "I'm after"?

    Any better suggestions?

    Thanks,

  2. #2
    riverkid is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,063
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: next, after

    Quote Originally Posted by Nefertiti View Post
    Hi, there.

    I was waiting in line. A lady in front of me was getting served.

    Was it Okay to tell the staff who worked there,

    "I'm the next"? No. I'm the next in line. //I'm the next [customer/person/one].
    "I'm next"? Okeydokey
    "I'm next to her"? No, Nefertiti. This means beside her.
    "I'm after her" Okay.
    "I'm after" Nope.

    Any better suggestions?

    Thanks,
    ====

  3. #3
    LwyrFirat is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    343
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: next, after

    I have a question about that issue as well.

    Can we use the phrase "It's my turn"in these kind of cases or do we need an order which is cycling to use it?
    Last edited by LwyrFirat; 15-Sep-2007 at 23:16.

  4. #4
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: next, after

    You could say that. It would sound a bit aggressive.

  5. #5
    Nefertiti is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    383
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: next, after

    Hi there.

    A: "Who's next?"

    B: "I'm next."


    1. Is 'next' a pronoun?

    2. Please explain your answer to Q1.

    Thanks,

  6. #6
    Soup's Avatar
    Soup is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: next, after

    #1 Dictionary
    NeXT - Definitions from Dictionary.com

    adjective
    1. immediately following in time or order; "the [next] day"; "next in line"; "the next president"; "the next item on the list"


    #2Ellipsis
    Who is (the) next (person) in line?

  7. #7
    justinwschang is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    118
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: next, after

    Quote Originally Posted by Nefertiti View Post
    Hi there.

    A: "Who's next?"

    B: "I'm next."


    1. Is 'next' a pronoun? No, "next" is never a pronoun. In (A) and (B) above, it's an adverb.

    2. Please explain your answer to Q1.

    Thanks,
    (A) Many words can be used as more than one part of speech.

    Music is for all (pronoun, means everyone)
    All animals need water (adjective)
    The answers are all correct (adverb)

    (B) An adverb not only tells more about a verb, but can be used to tell more about an adjective or another adverb.

    This is very good (good = adjective, very = adverb)
    My teacher is never late (late = adverb, never = adverb)

    (C) The word Next can be used as an adjective, adverb, or noun.

    Next person (adjective)
    Next Monday (adjective)
    Next turn (adjective)
    Who's next (predicate adverb of "is") )
    I'm next (predicate adverb of "am")
    You're next in line (predicate adverb of "are" or "were")
    When next you call..(adverb)
    The next is you (noun, means next person or thing)

    (D) As an adverb, "next" means in the time, order, or place immediately following, or on the first following (or subsequent) occasion. So,

    Who's (next)
    Who's (in the order immediately following)
    I'm (next)
    I'm (in the order immediately following)
    When (next) you call
    When (on the first following occasion) you call.


  8. #8
    engee30's Avatar
    engee30 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,819
    Post Thanks / Like

    Wink Re: next, after

    Quote Originally Posted by justinwschang View Post
    (A) Many words can be used as more than one part of speech.
    ...
    My teacher is never late (late = adverb, never = adverb)
    ...
    I hate to disagree with you, justinwschang, but in the sentence above it's only never that is an adverb; late is the predicative adjective there. Actually, you should know that all linking verbs take the predicative adjectives (and not adverbs) as their complement.

  9. #9
    justinwschang is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    118
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: next, after

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    I hate to disagree with you, justinwschang, but in the sentence above it's only never that is an adverb; late is the predicative adjective there. Actually, you should know that all linking verbs take the predicative adjectives (and not adverbs) as their complement.
    engee30
    The word everwhere (for example) is an adverb. The leaves are everywhere (= predicate adverb of are). Again: I was there (adverb) = I was in/at that place.

    The meaning of the verb Be (and other linking verbs like become, seem, appear) is only complete if read with a noun, pronoun, adjective, or adverb in the predicate, called the predicate word (or complement) of the linking verb. A linking verb is thus called because it connects or links its subject to its complement: She was home.

    I am in Beijing (predicate noun)
    You were with them (predicate pronoun)
    We are lucky (predicate adjective)
    He was early (predicate adverb)

  10. #10
    Soup's Avatar
    Soup is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: next, after

    Quote Originally Posted by justinwschang View Post
    (D) As an adverb, "next" means in the time, order, or place immediately following, or on the first following (or subsequent) occasion. So,

    Who's (next)
    Who's (in the order immediately following)
    I'm (next)
    I'm (in the order immediately following)
    When (next) you call
    When (on the first following occasion) you call.

    So, you're saying next is an adverb because it tells us where the person is, right? So,

    Location = adverb
    Who is upstairs in the house?
    Who is in the house upstairs?

    Who is next in line?
    Who is in line next?

    Cool.

    Adjective: Who is (the) next (person in line)?
    Adverb: Who is (the person) next (in line)?

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •