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  1. #1
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    Default suffer or suffer from

    On the other hand, women who suffera fracture due to osteoporosis aren't any more likely to take calcium supplements than healthy women.

    I think it's quite OK to replace "suffer" with "suffer from".

  2. #2
    PammyLorel Guest

    Default Re: suffer or suffer from

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    On the other hand, women who suffera fracture due to osteoporosis aren't any more likely to take calcium supplements than healthy women.

    I think it's quite OK to replace "suffer" with "suffer from".
    Note it is "suffer a" which may be replace with "suffer from a".

  3. #3
    Susie Smith Guest

    Default Re: suffer or suffer from

    Quote Originally Posted by PammyLorel
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    On the other hand, women who suffera fracture due to osteoporosis aren't any more likely to take calcium supplements than healthy women.

    I think it's quite OK to replace "suffer" with "suffer from".
    Note it is "suffer a" which may be replace with "suffer from a".
    I'd say that generally someone who is experiencing physical or mental pain or discomfort, suffers from ...........
    She suffers from migraine. / He suffers from hypertension.

    If something suffers an unpleasant or difficult experience, it happens to them.
    She suffered a compound fracture. The Democrats suffered a big defeat.

    She is suffering from a headache because she suffered a fall.

    I wouldn't say: She is suffering a headache because she suffered from a fall.

    Does this make sense? :D

  4. #4
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    Default Re: suffer or suffer from

    Quote Originally Posted by PammyLorel
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    On the other hand, women who suffera fracture due to osteoporosis aren't any more likely to take calcium supplements than healthy women.

    I think it's quite OK to replace "suffer" with "suffer from".
    Note it is "suffer a" which may be replace with "suffer from a".
    Many thanks, PammyLore.

  5. #5
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: suffer or suffer from

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    On the other hand, women who suffera fracture due to osteoporosis aren't any more likely to take calcium supplements than healthy women.

    I think it's quite OK to replace "suffer" with "suffer from".
    It would be OK, but not usual. In medicine, one usually suffers an event, a trauma, etc., but suffers from a condition, illness, disease etc. There is some overlap. One suffers a stroke (the event) or suffers from a stroke (the aftermath). In your example, the person suffers a fracture, but suffers from osteoporosis. :wink:

  6. #6
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    Default Re: suffer or suffer from

    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by PammyLorel
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    On the other hand, women who suffera fracture due to osteoporosis aren't any more likely to take calcium supplements than healthy women.

    I think it's quite OK to replace "suffer" with "suffer from".
    Note it is "suffer a" which may be replace with "suffer from a".
    I'd say that generally someone who is experiencing physical or mental pain or discomfort, suffers from ...........
    She suffers from migraine. / He suffers from hypertension.

    If something suffers an unpleasant or difficult experience, it happens to them.
    She suffered a compound fracture. The Democrats suffered a big defeat.

    She is suffering from a headache because she suffered a fall.

    I wouldn't say: She is suffering a headache because she suffered from a fall.

    Does this make sense? :D
    Very impressive explanation.(Bravo Bravo).
    Your examples are much appreciated. Now I understand. Thanks, Susan.

  7. #7
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: suffer or suffer from

    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by PammyLorel
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    On the other hand, women who suffera fracture due to osteoporosis aren't any more likely to take calcium supplements than healthy women.

    I think it's quite OK to replace "suffer" with "suffer from".
    Note it is "suffer a" which may be replace with "suffer from a".
    I'd say that generally someone who is experiencing physical or mental pain or discomfort, suffers from ...........
    She suffers from migraine. / He suffers from hypertension.

    If something suffers an unpleasant or difficult experience, it happens to them.
    She suffered a compound fracture. The Democrats suffered a big defeat.

    She is suffering from a headache because she suffered a fall.

    I wouldn't say: She is suffering a headache because she suffered from a fall.

    Does this make sense? :D
    Very good. I wrote mine before I read yours. You hit the nail on the head. :wink:

  8. #8
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    Default Re: suffer or suffer from

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    On the other hand, women who suffera fracture due to osteoporosis aren't any more likely to take calcium supplements than healthy women.

    I think it's quite OK to replace "suffer" with "suffer from".
    It would be OK, but not usual. In medicine, one usually suffers an event, a trauma, etc., but suffers from a condition, illness, disease etc. There is some overlap. One suffers a stroke (the event) or suffers from a stroke (the aftermath). In your example, the person suffers a fracture, but suffers from osteoporosis. :wink:
    I see. There is some overlap, which is very annoying for a language learner.

    Dear Mike, you hit the nail on the head too.

  9. #9
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    Default Re: suffer or suffer from

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    On the other hand, women who suffera fracture due to osteoporosis aren't any more likely to take calcium supplements than healthy women.

    I think it's quite OK to replace "suffer" with "suffer from".
    It would be OK, but not usual. In medicine, one usually suffers an event, a trauma, etc., but suffers from a condition, illness, disease etc. There is some overlap. One suffers a stroke (the event) or suffers from a stroke (the aftermath). In your example, the person suffers a fracture, but suffers from osteoporosis. :wink:
    I see. There is some overlap, which is very annoying for a language learner.

    Dear Mike, you hit the nail on the head too.
    It would not be a serious error to confuse them, in most cases.

    :D :D :D :D

  10. #10
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    Default

    NES would never realize the fact that ESL learners are suffering from solecism because they suffered the inconsistence of English.


    Note.
    solecism ==> mental pain or discomfort (as Susie mentioned)
    inconsistence ==> unpleasant or difficult experience

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