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Thread: Squish

  1. brennan's Avatar

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    #1

    Squish

    Timbers fell down and squished his leg. He was seriously injured. His leg festered.

    is it correct to use squished and festered?


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    #2

    Re: Squish

    There's nothing intrinsically wrong with "squish" - though squashed would be more usual.

    Festering means the flesh has become infected, gone bad and is producing pus. Is this what you meant?

  2. brennan's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: Squish

    timbers fell down and squashed his legs.

    is the sentence correct?

    I want to describe that his legs had gone really bad, which means his legs were not same as the original shape. Any word is suitable to use it?

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    #4

    Re: Squish

    Quote Originally Posted by brennan View Post
    timbers fell down and squashed his legs.

    is the sentence correct?

    I want to describe that his legs had gone really bad, which means his legs were not same as the original shape. Any word is suitable to use it?
    How about "cripple" ?

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Squish

    I find "crushed" to be more natural than "squashed" and FAR more natural and "squished."


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    #6

    Re: Squish

    Quote Originally Posted by brennan View Post
    timbers fell down and squashed his legs.

    is the sentence correct?

    I want to describe that his legs had gone really bad, which means his legs were not same as the original shape. Any word is suitable to use it?
    I agree that "crushed"is probably the best word to use.

    They were deformed/misshapen afterwards. Other words: contorted; crooked; mangled.

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    #7

    Re: Squish

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    I agree that "crushed"is probably the best word to use.

    They were deformed/misshapen afterwards. Other words: contorted; crooked; mangled.
    A fiercer word (though not necessarily meant in the sentence): Quashed = annulled, obliterated, "kaputted" (kaput is only an adjective, though I think it's nice as a verb).

  4. brennan's Avatar

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    #8

    Re: Squish

    thank you so much, everyone
    learnt a lot of new words from your posts.


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    #9

    Re: Squish

    Quote Originally Posted by justinwschang View Post
    A fiercer word (though not necessarily meant in the sentence): Quashed = annulled, obliterated, "kaputted" (kaput is only an adjective, though I think it's nice as a verb).

    I have never seen a quashed leg, nor indeed a quashed finger. It is not a correct usage in this context.

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    #10

    Re: Squish

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    I have never seen a quashed leg, nor indeed a quashed finger. It is not a correct usage in this context.
    Sorry, Anglika, I was being irreverant, pushing a bit at the holy frontiers of language, like young people like to do (what will language do without them!) though I can't put myself in that category anymore.

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