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  1. #1
    Andy Guest

    Default Venn Diagram of English Verb patterns

    Hi,

    I'm new to this forum. It looks pretty good, though.

    I'm trying to create a Venn diagram of the English verb pattern which I've made into a website.

    I'm currently trying to find examples of verbs that form the pattern:

    Verb+question word+to+infinitive
    Verb+object+question word+subject+verb

    If anyone knows of any examples, I'd love to know.


    I'm also working on the modals section, if anyone is interested in modal verbs, let me know.

    Thanks.
    You can see my website at:

    http://www.geocities.com/endipatterson/Catenative.html
    The diagram is clickable and links to different pages.


    Andy.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    Hi, Andy, this used to be on a different URL, didn't it? I had already added it to our links page (http://www.usingenglish.com/links/La...tics/Modality/), so I have updated the details. If you would like to write an intro,I'll add that,too.

  3. #3
    Andy Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Hi, Andy, this used to be on a different URL, didn't it? I had already added it to our links page (http://www.usingenglish.com/links/La...tics/Modality/), so I have updated the details. If you would like to write an intro,I'll add that,too.
    Thanks for getting back to me, Tdol.

    This diagram has been on different URL's - when I first set up the website, my programming skills were not that good. I set up a second website while leaving the original while I transferred the commentary into links, which was originally on the top, bottom and sides of the diagram.

    Actually, I'm not sure if I should change the URL again. The diagram started as just gerunds and infinitives, then became the catenatives. For most of the diagrams existence it has been titled, "Venn Diagram of the English Catenatives." I changed the title to "Venn Diagram of English Verb Patterns," because it more acurately describes the diagram as it has developed.

    As far as I know, however, you have not linked to the diagram before. I tried to link to http://www.usingenglish.com/links/La...stics/Modality, but it was a dead link. The post that you replied to was my first link to the forum, but I would be happy for you to do so, although many of the links are still under construction. Any help particularly with the sections that I mentioned before would be appreciated.

    As for the introduction, I have in fact provided an overview of the diagram which you can read by clicking the yin yang symbol. I appreciate, though, that I have not indicated this clearly.

  4. #4
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy
    I tried to link to http://www.usingenglish.com/links/La...stics/Modality, but it was a dead link.
    The correct link is: http://www.usingenglish.com/links/La...tics/Modality/



    PS - Welcome to UsingEnglish!
    Red5
    Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com

  5. #5
    Andy Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Red5
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy
    I tried to link to http://www.usingenglish.com/links/La...stics/Modality, but it was a dead link.
    The correct link is: http://www.usingenglish.com/links/La...tics/Modality/



    PS - Welcome to UsingEnglish!
    Thanks for the link. Well I can't remember posting my diagram here, perhaps it got here by another route.

    It definitely covers more than just the catenatives now, though. Would you mind changing the name to, "Venn diagram of English verb patterns"?

    I've added an introduction because you wanted one.

    Thanks.

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Thanks- it actually was sent to me by a teacher who passes on links he finds for inclusion.

  7. #7
    Andy Guest

    Default

    Thanks to everyone who replied.

    Now I have a question about usage. I'd like to know which of the following sentences you find acceptable, and which you don't. There may be different usage in different English speaking countries, so please include your nationality.

    1. a) He convinced me he was sincere.
    b) He convinced me that he was sincere.

    2 a) He persuaded me he was taking the right course of action.
    b) He persuaded me that he was taking the right course of action.

    3 a) He reminded me I had to post the letter.
    b) He reminded me that I had to post the letter.

    4 a) He told me he had to go.
    b) He told me that he had to go.

    5 a) He warned me the roads were dangerous.
    b) He warned me that the roads were dangerous.

    6 a) He realised it was already too late.
    b) He realised that it was already too late.

    7 a) He said he was sorry.
    b) He said that he was sorry.

    8 a) He suspected John was a thief.
    b) He suspected that John was a thief.

    9 a) He promised he wouldn’t be long.
    b) He promised that he wouldn’t be long.

    10 a) He promised us he wouldn’t be long.
    b) He promised us that he wouldn’t be long.

    11 a) He complained the soup was cold.
    b) He complained that the soup was cold.

    12 a) He explained the waiter had a lot of tables to serve.
    b) He explained that the waiter had a lot of tables to serve.

    13 a) He suggested the restaurant should employ more waiters.
    b) He suggested that the restaurant should employ more waiters.

    14 a) He wrote he wasn’t satisfied with the service.
    b) He wrote that he wasn’t satisfied with the service.

  8. #8
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    I'd say all, though number 14 is not one I'd use.

  9. #9
    Andy Guest

    Default

    Thanks Tdol,

    So you think ALL of them are acceptable. You said 14 was not something that you would say, is that a) or b), or are you just saying that you don't like to write letters of complaint? This implies that "that" can always be dropped in your ideolect. I deliberately included some examples in which "that" is definitely compulsory in British English. The reason for posting this is to determine where "that" can be dropped and where it's compulsory.

  10. #10
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Sorry; I would use 'that' in 14. Dropping it sounds a bit American, but I could be wrong.

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