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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile she new to town

    Don't scare Anna! She's new to town. I'm trying to make her feel welcome.




    I wonder what the difference is between "She's new in town" and the underlined part. Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: she new to town

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Don't scare Anna! She's new to town. I'm trying to make her feel welcome.




    I wonder what the difference is between "She's new in town" and the underlined part. Thanks.
    She`s new in town - correct

    The use of the preposition to in your sentence may be informal, because, as far as I know, this preposition is used in order to express movement toward a place.

    She`s new to town might mean She`s come to town recently. I think, this is the explanation for using to in the sentence.

  2. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: she new to town

    Thanks, teia.
    But what is the difference between them?

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    #4

    Re: she new to town

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, teia.
    But what is the difference between them?
    You are welcome!

    All I know is that new to.. means
    having no previous experience of
    E.g.: He's new to this kind of work.
    New to might mean that she is completely new in town - it emphasizes the idea of not having visited or gone to that town before.
    New to puts a stronger emphasis [on the idea in the sentence] than the phrase new in.
    Last edited by Teia; 21-Sep-2007 at 18:38.

  3. angliholic's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: she new to town

    Thanks, teia, again.
    I now get the "new to" part, but as for "new in" could you say something about it?

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    #6

    Re: she new to town

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, teia, again.
    I now get the "new to" part, but as for "new in" could you say something about it?
    Welcome, again!

    New in town - it is a usual way to say that somebody is a newcomer to a town.
    New to town - it emphasizes the idea of being totally unaccustomed to the town
    Anyway, I would choose:
    She's unaccustomed to the city/town = She is new to town = She has never visited this town before.
    I would like to see some English natives` opinions.
    Last edited by Teia; 21-Sep-2007 at 18:44.


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    #7

    Re: she new to town

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Don't scare Anna! She's new to town. I'm trying to make her feel welcome.

    I wonder what the difference is between "She's new in town" and the underlined part. Thanks.
    While not advocating its use, I think it can be read as saying "she is new[ly come] to town".

    "She is new in town" = she is a new person in the town.

    "New in town" is certainly the more common usage.

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    #8

    Smile Re: she new to town

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    While not advocating its use, I think it can be read as saying "she is new[ly come] to town".

    "She is new in town" = she is a new person in the town.

    "New in town" is certainly the more common usage.
    Thanks, Anglika.

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