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  1. #1
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default grammar in context

    Dear teachers,

    Here is my first post divided in separate exercises, maybe this way it would be easier for you to answer my very long questions!

    Among the answers which are in bold face which ones are incorrect and why? If more than one answer is correct, what is the difference between them?

    Fill each of the following blanks.

    Miss Samantha Fox, the 20-year-old runaway student now reunited 1 with her family, said yesterday that she 2 could not face telling her parents that she 3 had been expelled from Swansea University.
    “I was just scared that everybody 4 would be disappointed,” she said. “The longer it went 5 on the harder it was. I really didn’t know what I 6 was going to do / was doing.”

    Miss Fox was asked 7 to leave the university three months after failing 8 to attend lectures. But, 9 too / being / feeling ashamed to tell her family, she continued 10 living/to live in her rooms as if 11 nothing had happened.

    The stress of keeping up the pretence finally showed last week, 12 when Miss Fox was supposed to return to Swansea after a short holiday 13 in/at the family home. 14 Instead / However/ Yet (Is "instead" better than "however" or "yet" because normally after "however" we should have a comma?) she went to London where she started to look for work.

    Her anxious parents telephoned the police after university friend rang 15 saying/to say Samantha hadn’t turned up. A nation-wide appeal was launched.
    16 Having spent a week around north London, Miss Fox contacted her brother on Monday night and asked 17 to be taken home.

    She 18 couldn’t clearly remember / couldn’t remember clearly (when should we put the adverb between the verb and the auxiliary and when should it come after the verb?) how she spent the last three months 19 since/after receiving the expulsion note. “It’s all a bit vague. Believe it or not, I 20 was still doing college work in my room, I hardly went 21 out at all.” She said she found the transition from home to university life very hard: “At school I was a model student.” She said she had not received 22 any counselling from the university to help her 23 cope / to cope ? with the burden of work and the stress of being 24 away / far/ far away / faraway ? from home. (Somebody told me that only away is correct because in this context it is not a question of distance but a question of not being at home. Is this right? And is "faraway in one word and adjective and not a preposition?)

    Her father was delighted (have) 25 to have his daughter home. “We love our daughter,” he said. “We would support and understand her 26 whatever / no matter what happened.”

    Thank you for your help.
    Héla

  2. #2
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: grammar in context

    Quote Originally Posted by hela
    Dear teachers,

    Here is my first post divided in separate exercises, maybe this way it would be easier for you to answer my very long questions!

    Among the answers which are in bold face which ones are incorrect and why? If more than one answer is correct, what is the difference between them?

    Fill each of the following blanks.

    Miss Samantha Fox, the 20-year-old runaway student now reunited 1 with her family, said yesterday that she 2 could not face telling her parents that she 3 had been expelled from Swansea University.
    “I was just scared that everybody 4 would be disappointed,” she said. “The longer it went 5 on the harder it was. I really didn’t know what I 6 was going to do / was doing.”
    I would choose "was doing" there, but "didn't know what to do" would also be correct. The first says that her action was not based on rational thinking; the second says that she was confused. I rejected "was going to do" because she actually did something -- she ran away.

    Miss Fox was asked 7 to leave the university three months after failing 8 to attend lectures. But, 9 too / being / feeling ashamed to tell her family, she continued 10 living/to live in her rooms as if 11 nothing had happened.
    I don't like the first sentence. I doubt that she was asked to leave because she failed to attend lectures three months earlier. It is likely that she didn't attend lectures over a period of three months or that the request was made three months earlier. I would say:

    Miss Fox was asked to leave the university after failing to attend lectures for three months.

    or

    Three months earlier, Miss Fox had been asked to leave the university for failing to attend lectures.

    Under 9, all three choice would work. I also think both in #10 work.

    The stress of keeping up the pretence finally showed last week, 12 when Miss Fox was supposed to return to Swansea after a short holiday 13 in/at the family home. 14 Instead / However/ Yet (Is "instead" better than "however" or "yet" because normally after "however" we should have a comma?) she went to London where she started to look for work.
    13 I would choose "at" on the grounds that she didn't spend all her time "in" the home.

    14 All three should have a comma. I would choose "instead" because she did other than had been expected. "However, tends to negate the first statement, which isn't really true here. "Yet" is OK, but I prefer "instead".

    Her anxious parents telephoned the police after university friend rang 15 saying/to say Samantha hadn’t turned up. A nation-wide appeal was launched.
    16 Having spent a week around north London, Miss Fox contacted her brother on Monday night and asked 17 to be taken home.
    \

    Her anxious parents telephoned the police after a university friend rang 15 saying/to say Samantha hadn’t turned up.

    15 I would choose the infinitive. That depicts the purpose better than the gerund, which depicts the action.

    16, 17 are OK.

    She 18 couldn’t clearly remember / couldn’t remember clearly (when should we put the adverb between the verb and the auxiliary and when should it come after the verb?) how she spent the last three months 19 since/after receiving the expulsion note. “It’s all a bit vague.
    18 I don't think it matters a great deal.
    19. I don't think that either one go with the "last". I would prefer "spent the three months after receiving....

    Believe it or not, I 20 was still doing college work in my room, I hardly went 21 out at all.” She said she found the transition from home to university life very hard: “At school I was a model student.” She said she had not received 22 any counselling from the university to help her 23 cope / to cope ? with the burden of work and the stress of being 24 away / far/ far away / faraway ? from home. (Somebody told me that only away is correct because in this context it is not a question of distance but a question of not being at home. Is this right? And is "faraway in one word and adjective and not a preposition?)
    Believe it or not, I 20 was still doing college work in my room; I hardly went 21 out at all.”

    23. Either, but "cope" would be better IMO.
    24. The first three are OK. They are slightly different. "Away" places the focus on being in a strange location. The next two place the focus on the distance from home. I don't think we know what the real reason was.
    The single for "faraway" is only an adjective.


    Her father was delighted (have) 25 to have his daughter home. “We love our daughter,” he said. “We would support and understand her 26 whatever / no matter what happened.”

    Thank you for your help.
    Héla
    26 "no matter". The "whatever" does not go with the following "what".

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