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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Dear Cas,

    You just make my day before I'm going to hit the hay. (Does it rhyme?)

    :D
    It's so sweet. :D

    Try,

    You ' just ' now ' made ' my ' day (6)
    be ' fore ' I ' hit ' the ' hay (6)

    8)

    You just now made my day,
    be fore I have my say.


  2. #12
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    Default Re: Starting a new "native-speaker-only expressions&quo

    Quote Originally Posted by Cooler
    Dear teachers, I have a little suggestion and maybe you can think about it. Could you consider starting a new thread named something like "native-speaker-only expressions", where you guys may put some expressions that you think may be unlikely to be heard from a non-native-speaker? I browsed the forum and found some expressions like that. For example,
    If you would like me to I will move this one to General Discussions (Language). :)

    Quote Originally Posted by Cooler
    It would seem that a person's political affiliation would have nothing whatsoever to do with that person's participation in a sport.
    Hey, that's mine.

    :wink:

    Quote Originally Posted by Cooler
    I think the blue parts are not something that ESL learners are likely to say. As for me, for example, I may say "It seems that..." and would not put a "whatsoever" behind "nothing".
    Perhaps you meant to say you would not put it after nothing.

    :)

    Quote Originally Posted by Cooler
    On the other hand, non-native-speakers may say something that you guys are not likely to say. For example, non-native-speakers tend to use "I think"(at least to me) when they want to express their opinion on something. I find that native speakers do not use "I think" that often. Could you also put some alternatives to that kind of "I think" expressions in the thread(maybe the thread name needs to be changed then), so we could use them sometimes for a change but not constantly saying "I think"?
    Hm. I use "I think" plenty on this forum, but I see what you mean. It may be a cultural thing. Also, it may be that some people see it as redundant to say "I think" when they are clearly expressing an opinion. However, it does perhaps add a degree of politeness.

    :)

    Quote Originally Posted by Cooler
    The question is how to define whether a particular expression is "native-speakers-only" or "non-natives-only"? I think( :wink: ) since you guys have answered so many questions on the forum, you may have had a good understanding of that. Then, how to single out a particular expressions since there are so many in your minds? You may pick any one of the posts, see some English used by non-native-speakers and then add something to the thread. You may do that once a while, when you could afford the time.
    That is an interesting question. I do, of course, recognize English idioms when I see them, but the other thing is more difficult. On the other hand, I do every once in a while demonstrate how an expression might be stated in idiomatic English. Is that the kind of thing you have in mind?

    :)

    Quote Originally Posted by Cooler
    I figure this thread may be helpful for ESL learners. Please think about it. It would be very nice to know your opinion on that.
    :wink:
    Okay.

    :wink:

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    "I think" I myself use a lot of "I think"s in Chinese too. LOL! I have observed an conversation run between two Chinese today, they spoke 47 times "I think" in one hour.

    I was just bored at the topic, so I counted.

    Chinese think a lot.

    :wink:

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Dear Cas,

    You just make my day before I'm going to hit the hay. (Does it rhyme?)

    :D
    Yep, join the club. Rub-a-dub-dub.

    :wink:

    (It might be a little better as: "You just made my day; now I'm gonna hit the hay.")

    :)

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    "I think" I myself use a lot of "I think"s in Chinese too. LOL! I have observed an conversation run between two Chinese today, they spoke 47 times "I think" in one hour.

    I was just bored at the topic, so I counted.

    Chinese think a lot.

    :wink:
    They are thoughful. LOL!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Dear Cas,

    You just make my day before I'm going to hit the hay. (Does it rhyme?)

    :D
    Yep, join the club. Rub-a-dub-dub.

    :wink:

    (It might be a little better as: "You just made my day; now I'm gonna hit the hay.")

    :)

    It's bed time! I'm afraid I can't sleep through rub-a-dub-dub.

    Have fun and good night.


  7. #17
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    It's bedtime there? For goodness sake, I'm wide awake.

    :wink:

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    It's bedtime there? For goodness sake, I'm wide awake.

    :wink:
    When it's bedtime here,
    I say 'Morning' there.
    When daytime is no fun,
    I say 'Good night', Ron.


    How's that?

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Starting a new "native-speaker-only expressions&

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooler
    Dear teachers, I have a little suggestion and maybe you can think about it. Could you consider starting a new thread named something like "native-speaker-only expressions", where you guys may put some expressions that you think may be unlikely to be heard from a non-native-speaker? I browsed the forum and found some expressions like that. For example,
    If you would like me to I will move this one to General Discussions (Language). :)
    That's fine. Thanks, Ron.

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooler
    It would seem that a person's political affiliation would have nothing whatsoever to do with that person's participation in a sport.
    Hey, that's mine.
    I have no idea how you recognised that is yours. :wink: Tell me, Ron, what is difference between "it would seem that..." and "it seems that..."? Maybe nothing much?

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooler
    I think the blue parts are not something that ESL learners are likely to say. As for me, for example, I may say "It seems that..." and would not put a "whatsoever" behind "nothing".
    Perhaps you meant to say you would not put it after nothing.
    Yes, that is what I meant. What I said is ambiguous, right? But what is the problem? What other meanings may it have?

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooler
    On the other hand, non-native-speakers may say something that you guys are not likely to say. For example, non-native-speakers tend to use "I think"(at least to me) when they want to express their opinion on something. I find that native speakers do not use "I think" that often. Could you also put some alternatives to that kind of "I think" expressions in the thread(maybe the thread name needs to be changed then), so we could use them sometimes for a change but not constantly saying "I think"?
    Hm. I use "I think" plenty on this forum, but I see what you mean. It may be a cultural thing. Also, it may be that some people see it as redundant to say "I think" when they are clearly expressing an opinion. However, it does perhaps add a degree of politeness.
    I now figure "I think" is not that "bad". :wink:

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooler
    The question is how to define whether a particular expression is "native-speakers-only" or "non-natives-only"? I think( :wink: ) since you guys have answered so many questions on the forum, you may have had a good understanding of that. Then, how to single out a particular expressions since there are so many in your minds? You may pick any one of the posts, see some English used by non-native-speakers and then add something to the thread. You may do that once a while, when you could afford the time.
    That is an interesting question. I do, of course, recognize English idioms when I see them, but the other thing is more difficult. On the other hand, I do every once in a while demonstrate how an expression might be stated in idiomatic English. Is that the kind of thing you have in mind?
    Hm, let me explain something here. As teachers on the forum, you may counter a variety of different English(Chinglish, etc). I figure there may be something that you are quite "impressive", because it is really far from what you would say. Then, if you could spare the time, instead of giving your suggestions in that post, put them in the thread that I suggest. I mean, you put all of these things together in a specific thread so all of learners may learn something from it. I understand this could be kind of over-demanding. That is why I called it a suggestion. I undertstand we have to think about the feasibility and some other factors.
    Whatever it is on your mind, please just tell me. :)

    Whatever it is, Ron, thank you very much. :D

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    It's bedtime there? For goodness sake, I'm wide awake.

    :wink:
    When it's bedtime here,
    I say 'Morning' there.
    When daytime is no fun,
    I say 'Good night', Ron.


    How's that?
    Well, "here" and "there" don't rhyme. And "fun" and "Ron" don't rhyme. Other than that, not bad.

    :wink:

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