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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    If I may chime in, 'in the long run' is sort of the opposite of 'short-term'.
    E.g.:
    "He has alot of go now, but in the long run he's bound to grow tired of the job like others".
    "He may win this hand [in poker], but in the long run it's going to cost him a sheer fortune if he goes on playing that kind of cheese".
    "Luck evens out in the long run".

    FRC
    Excellent. :D That makes a lot of sense. :wink: :D

  2. #12
    razakabbi Guest

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    I NEED SOME MORE EXPLANATION ABOUT THE WORD 'IN THE LONG RUN'WITH SIMPLE
    ENGLISH AND EXAMPLES. WHAT MAY BE THE ALTERNATIVE WORD FOR THE SAME THAT IN THE EXAMPLES GIVEN BY MR. FRANCOIS?

  3. #13
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    I'll give it another try:
    Let's say you play heads or tails. This is a game when you flip a coin, and you try to predict what side the coin will fall on. Obviously there's no skill involved in this game, this is just pure luck. If it's your lucky day, you can score several wins in a row. Maybe you'll win the next ten games, who knows.
    However, in the long run, you will just get as many wins as losses. That is, after you've played enough times. On four or five events, anything can happen, but if you play longer, you will just win 50% of the times.
    Likewise, maybe you enjoy your job right now, but in the long run (after ten years for instance), you might find it very boring.
    We could say 'in the long run' means more or less 'after enough time', or 'after a lot of time'.

    Let's rephrase my examples:

    "He is very motivated now, but after ten years he will certainly be tired of the job".
    "He may win this hand [in poker] because he's lucky, but after one thousand similar hands it's going to cost him alot if he goes on playing that kind of bad hand (he doesn't even have a pair for instance)".
    "Luck evens out if you play long enough".

    Is it clearer?

    FRC

  4. #14
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    Default Perhaps a more vivid example

    Similarly, you could say "he drinks alot of beer every day, but in the long run this will cause him health problems" (even though right now, he's healthy).

    FRC

  5. #15
    razakabbi Guest

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    yes fine. Now it is very clear.

    thank you.

    I think 'as many as' means 'about'

    as many as 100 prisoners=about 100 prisoners?

  6. #16
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    I think 'as many as' means 'about'
    Not exactly. if one says "you will just get as many wins as losses", this means you will have the same number of wins and losses. Of course, in the heads or tails example, this is unlikely to be exactly the same number, but 'as many as' still means 'the same number'.
    Also, one can say "As many as 100 prisoners have escaped from Rikers over the last decade"; here the empasis is on the large number. But there's not really the idea of approximation as in 'about'.

    FRC

  7. #17
    razakabbi Guest

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    O.K THANK YOU.

    WHAT IS THE NOUN FORM OF THE WORD 'CLIMB'?PLEASE ANSWER. CLIMB ITSELF?

  8. #18
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    Jun 2004
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    Yes, a climb.

    FRC

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