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Thread: Suffix


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    #1

    Suffix

    What is problematic in
    1. regiment
    2fragment

    ment, as suffix please explain in detail

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    #2

    Re: Suffix

    The suffix -ment is attached to verbs to make nouns. The suffix -ment traces back to the Latin noun suffix -mentum.
    For example
    The English noun fragment comes from the Latin noun fragmentum "a fragment, remnant," a combination of the verb frangere "to break" and the suffix -mentum. (Cf. the noun regiment comes from the Latin noun regimentum "rule, direction," from the verb regimen.)
    Latin: frangere (verb) + -mentum (suffix) = fragmentum
    Latin to English: fragmentum (a prodictive morpheme) became fragment (a fused morpheme).

    Frag wasn't a verb in English until 1970:
    Frag as a verb is first attested 1970 in U.S. military slang, from fragmentation grenade (1918).
    The oddity about the fused morphemes fragment and regiment
    Frag is a new verb (from the noun fragmentation), making fragment (a previously fused morpheme) appear productive:

    Modern English: frag (verb) + -ment (suffix)
    ______________
    § 29. -ment. 8. Word Formation. The American Heritage Book of English Usage. 1996
    Online Etymology Dictionary

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    #3

    Re: Suffix

    I've nothing to add to Soup's answer, except with reference to the first line of your question. What may be regarded as problematic - I don't think it is, rather "interesting" - is the stress (which moves from the first syllable to the last as you move from the noun to the verb).

    b

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    #4

    Re: Suffix

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    ... the first line of your question. What may be regarded as problematic - I don't think it is, rather "interesting" - is the stress (which moves from the first syllable to the last as you move from the noun to the verb).
    The Latin forms? (You've lost me... )

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    #5

    Re: Suffix

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    The Latin forms? (You've lost me... )
    Nothing about Latin. Just /'frægmənt/ (noun) as opposed to /fræg'ment/ verb.
    Perhaps this doesn't happen in Canada...?

    b

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    #6

    Re: Suffix

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Nothing about Latin. Just /'frægmənt/ (noun) as opposed to /fræg'ment/ verb.
    Perhaps this doesn't happen in Canada...?

    b
    Oh, no, it does.

    Sorry. My mind was somewhere else at the time--on the false analogical development here, regiment and fragment.

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    #7

    Re: Suffix

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    ...
    Frag wasn't a verb in English until 1970:
    Frag as a verb is first attested 1970 in U.S. military slang, from fragmentation grenade (1918).
    ...
    Incidentally, there's an even more recent coining [at least, I'd guess it is], presumably formed from this: defrag

    defrag - definition of defrag by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    b

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    #8

    Re: Suffix

    Yes, yes! That's an added bonus for Martin, the person who started this thread. Keen eye. Frag is a Modern English verb, unrelated to Latin frangere(v.), fragmentum (n.).


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    #9

    Re: Suffix

    Hi Soup Thanks alot for the help


    martin

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    #10

    Re: Suffix

    Quote Originally Posted by matin View Post
    What is problematic in
    1. regiment
    2fragment

    ment, as suffix please explain in detail
    Aha - I get it (at last ). As Soup said, in fragment and regiment the -ment was already fused into the meaning-bearing unit when English borrowed the word from Latin. This makes the -ment different from the -ment suffix in words like "Atonement" (where atone never had anything to do directly* with Latin: Online Etymology Dictionary )

    b
    PS
    * The only link with Latin was that it used English words (at and one) to imitate the structure of the Latin adunare.

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