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  1. #1
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    Default sleep together/ with

    Both meanings are similiar, referring to someone has sex with another person, especially someone you are not married to.

    When I was a kid, my parents and I were under the same roof. I could remember that Mom, Dad and me share one bedroom. I have my own little bed. Does it make sense if I say to someone

    "I used to sleep with mom and dad when I was young"

    or

    "My parents and me slept together when I was young."

    Would it lead to any possible misunderstanding?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: sleep together/ with

    Hi,

    Yes, you would be probably misunderstood if you said your sentences. It sounds as if you slept with them in the same bed, not necessarily having sex, though.

    Here are some corrections of your sentences:

    '....referring to someone having (not has) sex.....'

    'I remember that my Mom, Dad, and I (not me) shared one bedroom.'

    'I had my own little bed....or a crib perhaps? (a bed for babies).

    'My parents and I (not me) slept together....'


    Iza




    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Both meanings are similiar, referring to someone has sex with another person, especially someone you are not married to.

    When I was a kid, my parents and I were under the same roof. I could remember that Mom, Dad and me share one bedroom. I have my own little bed. Does it make sense if I say to someone

    "I used to sleep with mom and dad when I was young"

    or

    "My parents and me slept together when I was young."

    Would it lead to any possible misunderstanding?

  3. #3
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    Default

    Hi, thank you very much for thoughful correction.

    And as you said, it could probably lead to misunderstanding. I believe there must be a proper way to describe my examples. Of course I do not want to sleep with my parents. H-OOOOO-rrible. Could you offer some more help with this?

    [Scenario]
    Mom and Dad sleep in the same bed.
    I sleep in my own bed. (Since I wasn't a baby, it couldn't be a crib or cradle, my bed was just smaller than the normal one.) :)
    We sleep together in the same bedroom, but I don't have sex with Mom and Dad. :wink:

    How can I use one sentence to combine the three ones?

  4. #4
    Susie Smith Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Hi, thank you very much for thoughful correction.

    And as you said, it could probably lead to misunderstanding. I believe there must be a proper way to describe my examples. Of course I do not want to sleep with my parents. H-OOOOO-rrible. Could you offer some more help with this?

    [Scenario]
    Mom and Dad sleep in the same bed.
    I sleep in my own bed. (Since I wasn't a baby, it couldn't be a crib or cradle, my bed was just smaller than the normal one.) :)
    We sleep together in the same bedroom, but I don't have sex with Mom and Dad. :wink:

    How can I use one sentence to combine the three ones?
    Something like this: When I was young, I shared a bedroom with Mom and Dad, but I slept in my own bed.

    If you say: "I used to sleep with my parents when I was young", I am going to think exactly that - that you slept with them.

    My little granddaughter often sleeps with her parents and I am not at all shocked when they talk about it. If I were not a widow, she would have slept with me and her grandpa too. Probably most of us slept with our parents on more than one occasion. I know all my boys did. ( Little kids seem to think it beats their own beds! ) In this context it would take a pretty dirty mind to imagine any kind of incestuous relationship.
    :wink:

  5. #5
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    Default

    Hi again,

    Susie's sentence looks good to me, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Hi, thank you very much for thoughful correction.

    And as you said, it could probably lead to misunderstanding. I believe there must be a proper way to describe my examples. Of course I do not want to sleep with my parents. H-OOOOO-rrible. Could you offer some more help with this?

    [Scenario]
    Mom and Dad sleep in the same bed.
    I sleep in my own bed. (Since I wasn't a baby, it couldn't be a crib or cradle, my bed was just smaller than the normal one.) :)
    We sleep together in the same bedroom, but I don't have sex with Mom and Dad. :wink:

    How can I use one sentence to combine the three ones?

  6. #6
    MikeNewYork's Avatar
    MikeNewYork is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: sleep together/ with

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Both meanings are similiar, referring to someone has sex with another person, especially someone you are not married to.

    When I was a kid, my parents and I were under the same roof. I could remember that Mom, Dad and me share one bedroom. I have my own little bed. Does it make sense if I say to someone

    "I used to sleep with mom and dad when I was young"

    or

    "My parents and me slept together when I was young."

    Would it lead to any possible misunderstanding?
    With clues such as "parents" and "young", there should be no confusion. When confusion is possible, one can rephrase the sentence to "shared a bedroom with" or "slept in the same room as"or "shared the bed with" or "slept in the same bed with", as the case may be. Usually it is an imposition, so using "had to" will also clear up the possible sex problem.
    :wink:

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    Susan, thanks for your vivid examples. (I was laughing out in the computer center and everyone gave me an unwelcome look. )

    Mike, thanks as always. @->--

    Iza, thank you very much indeed.


    Your language is weeeeeird. Sleep itself is simply a resting state. When you add any preposition to it, it changes the whole meaning and makes it no longer a resting state in which the body is active and the mind is conscious. Now I know how slight influence the preposition is. :wink:

  8. #8
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Susan, thanks for your vivid examples. (I was laughing out in the computer center and everyone gave me an unwelcome look. )

    Mike, thanks as always. @->--

    Iza, thank you very much indeed.


    Your language is weeeeeird. Sleep itself is simply a resting state. When you add any preposition to it, it changes the whole meaning and makes it no longer a resting state in which the body is active and the mind is conscious. Now I know how slight influence the preposition is. :wink:
    I think you meant to say that you now know how big a difference a preposition can make. Am I wrong?

    :)

  9. #9
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    Ron, you are right.


  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Susan, thanks for your vivid examples. (I was laughing out in the computer center and everyone gave me an unwelcome look. )

    Mike, thanks as always. @->--

    Iza, thank you very much indeed.


    Your language is weeeeeird. Sleep itself is simply a resting state. When you add any preposition to it, it changes the whole meaning and makes it no longer a resting state in which the body is active and the mind is conscious. Now I know how slight influence the preposition is. :wink:
    I think you meant to say that you now know how big a difference a preposition can make. Am I wrong?

    :)

    May I ask a question here?
    When you ask "Am I wrong?" Were you presupposing that you were right? If you ask "Am I right", you might not be sure of something, and need other's confirmation.

    Am I right? :wink:

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