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  1. #1
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    Default free from vs. free of

    How can we distinguish between the phrases "free from" and "free of"?

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: free from vs. free of

    To my ear, "from" denotes an undesirable external influence: 'free from interference/ prejudice/outside pressure/influence...'; whereas "of" usually applies to the contents of a mixture: for example, 'free of artificial additives'. But the two are quite close, and other teachers may disagree.

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  3. #3
    Naamplao is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: free from vs. free of

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    To my ear, "from" denotes an undesirable external influence: 'free from interference/ prejudice/outside pressure/influence...'; whereas "of" usually applies to the contents of a mixture: for example, 'free of artificial additives'. But the two are quite close, and other teachers may disagree.

    b
    I agree with you

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    Default Re: free from vs. free of

    Dear Naamplao and BobK

    Thank you for your answers. However, I think that there are certain phrases when we will use only one of them.

    e.g. free of charge/ duty
    free from fear

    Am I right?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: free from vs. free of

    Quote Originally Posted by sjc55 View Post
    Dear Naamplao and BobK

    Thank you for your answers. However, I think that there are certain phrases when we will use only one of them.

    e.g. free of charge/ duty
    free from fear

    Am I right?
    Yes - charge is part of the "content" of what you have to pay; fear is an undesirable influence. I don't understand your use of 'however'.

    b

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