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Thread: really true?

  1. #11
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Re: really true?

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Quote Originally Posted by A.Russell
    My Canon word tank is full of funny Japlish, if I hunt around in it a bit. It gives an example of "lap" -She lapped the baby in her shawl
    Oh! You edited it, Mr. Russell. And it was not an "r or l" problem.

    Yes, I've found the same kind of sentences as follows:

    She lapped her baby in the blanket.
    He lapped a blanket around himself.


    It was not until you notified it that I knew such sentences sounded strange to you native speakers.

    Could you tell me why they are funny?
    Perhaps it is because the person said lapped when the word should be wrapped. We (native speakers) would not say lapped there.

    :)

  2. #12
    A.Russell is offline Member
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    Default Re: really true?

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Quote Originally Posted by A.Russell
    My Canon word tank is full of funny Japlish, if I hunt around in it a bit. It gives an example of "lap" -She lapped the baby in her shawl
    Oh! You edited it, Mr. Russell. And it was not an "r or l" problem.

    Yes, I've found the same kind of sentences as follows:

    She lapped her baby in the blanket.
    He lapped a blanket around himself.


    It was not until you notified it that I knew such sentences sounded strange to you native speakers.


    Could you tell me why they are funny?
    Yes, I made a typo. Sorry, but your reply still has me chuckling. You must have the same dictionary :D

    I wonder if anyone will ever update the thing. It's been at least six years since I got my first Wordtank, and the new ones still have the same mistakes.... Or, no, couldn't be! Do other Japanese English dictionaries have that entry?

  3. #13
    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: really true?

    No it's not from Wordtank. And actually those two sentences above come from two different dictionaries. I suspect most Japanese might think that usage is quite normal because every dictionary has it as an example.

    Now, could you tell me why it's so funny?

  4. #14
    Susie Smith Guest

    Default Re: really true?

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    My English-Japanese dictionary says that the conjunction "as" can be used as "whereas", and gives an example of such usage as follows:

    (a) Men usually like wrestling whereas women do not= (b)Men usually like wrestling as women do not.

    Is this really true? To me (b) sounds really weird. Plus, I've checked several Engilish dictionaries at hand including The American Heritage, Oxford Advanced Learner's , but none of them says "as" can be used as "whereas".

    What do you think, teachers?
    [i](a) Men usually like wrestling whereas women do not. =
    Men usually like wrestling, while on the contrary women do not.

    (whereas = while on the contrary)
    :wink:

  5. #15
    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: really true?

    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    [i](a) Men usually like wrestling whereas women do not. =
    Men usually like wrestling, while on the contrary women do not.

    (whereas = while on the contrary)
    :wink:
    I know that, Susie. Thanks. :)

    (But isn't it a bit redundant? I think "while" or "on the contrary" alone is better.)

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    Default Re: really true?

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    My English-Japanese dictionary says that the conjunction "as" can be used as "whereas", and gives an example of such usage as follows:

    (a) Men usually like wrestling whereas women do not= (b)Men usually like wrestling as women do not.

    Is this really true? To me (b) sounds really weird. Plus, I've checked several Engilish dictionaries at hand including The American Heritage, Oxford Advanced Learner's , but none of them says "as" can be used as "whereas".

    What do you think, teachers?
    I see the pattern. :D Take a look at this:

    'as' and 'though' are synonyms in the following context,

    Questionable as it might seem, .... (OK)
    Questionable though it might seem,... (OK)

    'though' and 'whereas' are also synonyms,

    Men usually like wrestling whereas women do not. (OK)
    Men usually like wresting though women do not. (OK)

    But, 'whereas' and 'as' are not synonyms,

    Men usually like wrestling as women do not. (Not OK)

    Seems to me the writer of X Japanese-English dictionary made a very cool connection:

    whereas ~ though : though ~ as,
    therefore as ~ whereas

    Problem is, 'as' and 'whereas' are not synonyms. I'd tell your students 'as' is supposed to read as 'though' in,

    Men usually like wrestling though women do not. :D

    All the best,

  7. #17
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    Default

    Men usually like wrestling though women do not
    If you say that, doesn't it imply that you expected men no to like wrestling, because women don't?
    For instance, I would say "He was a republican though all his family had been democrats for generations" => you could have expected him to be a democrat too, given his upbringing.

    FRC

  8. #18
    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: really true?

    To Casiopea.

    I know "as" can be used as "though", but it can be so only when it has the "(adj or adv) as S+V" construction, right? So I think the author of the dictionary is wrong anyway.

    (By the way, could you tell me why the usage of "lap" above sounds wierd to you native speakers?)[/i]

  9. #19
    A.Russell is offline Member
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    Default Re: really true?

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    To Casiopea.

    (By the way, could you tell me why the usage of "lap" above sounds wierd to you native speakers?)[/i]
    RonBee already gave you the answer:

    the person said lapped when the word should be wrapped
    It's like those shops in the Japanese coutryside that are always crosed, cameras that go "crick" and how when Japanese men have an errection, they vote. :D

    Sorry, couldn't resist that last joke.





    [/i]

  10. #20
    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: really true?

    Quote Originally Posted by A.Russell
    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    To Casiopea.

    (By the way, could you tell me why the usage of "lap" above sounds wierd to you native speakers?)[/i]
    RonBee already gave you the answer:the person said lapped when the word should be wrapped
    Oops! I missed it. Thank you, Ron.

    But then, what exactly is the difference between "lap" and "wrap"?

    Quote Originally Posted by A.Russell
    It's like those shops in the Japanese coutryside that are always crosed, cameras that go "crick" and how when Japanese men have an errection, they vote. :D

    Sorry, couldn't resist that last joke.
    Well, that's your jokes; I beleive Japanese dictionaries are not that bad to have such entries.

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