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  1. #1
    nyggus is offline Key Member
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    Question On these grounds

    "The cause of a lawsuit between the owl and the kite" by Alice Elizabeth Dracott starts with the following sentence:

    "The owl and the kite once went to law on these grounds."

    I have problems with understanding "on these grounds". Since this is the very first sentence of the story, I understand it means something like "The owl and the kite once went to law on the following grounds", the grounds meaning more or less foundation/basis. Is my way of thinking at least close to what it should be?

    Many thanks,
    Nyggus

  2. #2
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    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Smile Re: On these grounds

    Quote Originally Posted by nyggus View Post
    "The cause of a lawsuit between the owl and the kite" by Alice Elizabeth Dracott starts with the following sentence:

    "The owl and the kite once went to law on these grounds."

    I have problems with understanding "on these grounds". Since this is the very first sentence of the story, I understand it means something like "The owl and the kite once went to law on the following grounds", the grounds meaning more or less foundation/basis. Is my way of thinking at least close to what it should be?

    Many thanks,
    Nyggus
    I'd say you've got it!
    The pronoun these introduces something that is included in the text further on. You could also say for these/the following reasons interpreting the phrase on these grounds.

  3. #3
    nyggus is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: On these grounds

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    I'd say you've got it!
    The pronoun these introduces something that is included in the text further on. You could also say for these/the following reasons interpreting the phrase on these grounds.
    Is it a standard form, then? Can I start a passage with these words (got it!):
    "The reasons for these problems are these. and here the reasons go"?

    Thanks,
    Nyggus

  4. #4
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    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Smile Re: On these grounds

    Quote Originally Posted by nyggus View Post
    Is it a standard form, then? Can I start a passage with these words (got it!):
    "The reasons for these problems are these. and here the reasons go"?

    Thanks,
    Nyggus
    This time, it's too many these that make the text less readable.
    Try this:

    "The reasons for these problems are (as follows):..."

    This is a very standard usage.

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