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Thread: Adj or adv?

  1. #1
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
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    Default Adj or adv?

    I have seen such sentence like:
    This is another total different matter (1)
    This is another totally different matter (2)

    I think that in sentence (1), people use total as an adj and in sentence (2) as an adv. Why do people use adj instead of adv here? (Except for informal speech).

  2. #2
    2006 is offline Banned
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    Default Re: Adj or adv?

    (1) is not correct.

  3. #3
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Adj or adv?

    But I have seen 2 , 3 or 4 adjs go together like:
    An interesting English film
    but not
    An interestingly English film
    why?

  4. #4
    Teia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Adj or adv?

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    But I have seen 2 , 3 or 4 adjs go together like:
    An interesting English film
    but not
    An interestingly English film
    why?
    An interesting English film - adjective [it modifies the noun film]

    An interestingly directed English film - adverb [it modifies the word directed]

    This is another totally different matter.

    to be different - linking verb + adjective
    totally - adverb modifying the verbal phrase to be different

    totally means completely, wholly, entirely

    Let`s rephrase your sentence :
    This is another completely different matter [different from the one we talked about yesterday]
    Last edited by Teia; 13-Oct-2007 at 17:21.

  5. #5
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default Re: Adj or adv?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    (1) is not correct.
    Language science tends not to use terms like "incorrect", 2006, substituting terms like non-standard.

    What good is the study of any subject if it's simply a matter of people's varying opinions? 'nonstandard' covers the situation perfectly because the rules that govern casual speech are decidedly different than those that describe other registers.

  6. #6
    2006 is offline Banned
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    Default Re: Adj or adv?

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    Language science tends not to use terms like "incorrect", 2006, substituting terms like non-standard.

    What good is the study of any subject if it's simply a matter of people's varying opinions? 'nonstandard' covers the situation perfectly because the rules that govern casual speech are decidedly different than those that describe other registers.
    You can call it what you like, I'll call it "incorrect". Correct English does have rules; it's not all a matter of "opinion".

  7. #7
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default Re: Adj or adv?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    You can call it what you like, I'll call it "incorrect". Correct English does have rules; it's not all a matter of "opinion".
    I never said it was a matter of opinion, 2006. Isn't that what you are expressing, an opinion of how you want language to be? Language doesn't conform to opinions, it never has and it never will. It can't.

    Can you imagine the muddle language would be if we tried to conform to all the silly prescriptions that have been touted as rules over the years.

    In actuality, it's simply a matter of language fact. Nonstandard does not equal incorrect. It simply means that it doesn't match Standard English.
    Last edited by riverkid; 13-Oct-2007 at 22:03.

  8. #8
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default Re: Adj or adv?

    Standard English. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.

    In recent years, however, the term has more often been used to distinguish the speech and writing of middle-class educated speakers from the speech of other groups and classes, which are termed nonstandard. This is the sense in which the word is used in the usage labels in this dictionary. But it should be borne in mind that when it is used in this way, the term is highly elastic and variable, since what counts as Standard English will depend on both the locality and the particular varieties that Standard English is being contrasted with. A form that is considered standard in one region may be nonstandard in another, and a form that is standard by contrast with one variety (for example the language of inner-city African Americans) may be considered nonstandard by contrast with the usage of middle-class professionals. No matter how it is interpreted, however, Standard English in this sense shouldn't be regarded as being necessarily correct or unexceptionable,

  9. #9
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Adj or adv?

    To get back on topic:

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    But I have seen 2 , 3 or 4 adjs go together like:
    An interesting English film
    but not
    An interestingly English film
    why?
    There is a difference of meaning:

    An interesting English film = an English film that is interesting.

    An interestingly English film = A film that is notably English in its content/appearance/style.

  10. #10
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Adj or adv?

    I can infer from your answer, Anglinka, that Interesting modifies for film and so does English. But if you use Interestingly, it would modify for the adj English, isn't it?

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