Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 34
  1. #11
    jctgf is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    1,860
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mariranalily View Post
    "English is very important." "English is the key to the world."
    These are what teachers told us, and we all realized that in our country.

    But, what about those missing languages? What happened to them?
    What will happen after those lanugaes missing? Nothing will happen?
    Why those languages is vanishing?

    What is the definition of "important" in the language field?
    Do you think the problem here is only about the language?

    Please reply me as soon as you can, thank you very much!!!

    saying that english is "the key to the world" is simply to go overboard.

  2. #12
    Codemaster is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    I love Turkish because it is the richest lang. in the world.

  3. #13
    atlaisha is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    301
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    [quote=mousa;218335]
    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Languages are dying out at a very fast rate nowadays. I am afraid that most small languages are unlikely to survive.[/qu
    In my view Languge is part of nations' tradtion or more clearly langugues are treated with alot of respect in most countries. If we look back to any languge we will find huge differances due to technology and many other things but that does not mean these languges are dying .
    personally , I found it that most pepole proude of their own languge and as far as they doing that there is no worries. people learn other languges and mostly English to get more benfits of the technology and also make them able to comminucate with pepole around the world.

    Hi,
    i wanted to tell you that if you observe your own language,you'll see it is really endangered,though many people around the world speak it, but yet the amount of foreign words entering the language and the amount of native words exiting and being forgotten by native speakers shows that how terribly parsi is in danger.for example nowadays people are more likely to use absolutely newly entered english words in their everyday conversations like:ok,yes,box,delete,message and tons of english words that entered parsi with computers and cellphones.and if you compare the words and phrases people use today with those they used like 50 years ago you'll see how deeply it's changed.and yet parsi is in good conditions comparing with those small languages spoken in certain areas everywhere in the world just like small languages that are in verge of extinction in iran.

    i think technology rules in expanding a language.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,553
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Just because a language borrows words and phrases from other languages doesn't mean that language is endangered.

    English has long borrowed words from other languages. Here are just a few examples:

    kindergarten
    anorak
    igloo
    video
    perestroika
    glasnost
    holocaust
    café
    schadenfreude
    céilidh
    graffiti
    blitz

    ...and so on.

  5. #15
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,985
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    English is a mix of languages and has always been able to absob words from other languages without this being seen as a threat.

  6. #16
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,570
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss View Post
    Just because a language borrows words and phrases from other languages doesn't mean that language is endangered.

    English has long borrowed words from other languages. Here are just a few examples:

    kindergarten
    anorak
    igloo
    video
    perestroika
    glasnost
    holocaust
    café
    schadenfreude
    céilidh
    graffiti
    blitz

    ...and so on.
    I agree with cafe, but céilidh? Eh?


  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,553
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    I agree with cafe, but céilidh?
    From Irish and Scottish Gaelic; an evening of music and dance, a sort of Gaelic barn dance. English céilidhs have grown in popularity (and are sometimes called "eCeilidhs".) I'm not sure exactly what the difference is between a barn dance and an English céilidh, but I am assured there is one.

  8. #18
    atlaisha is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    301
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss View Post
    Just because a language borrows words and phrases from other languages doesn't mean that language is endangered.

    English has long borrowed words from other languages. Here are just a few examples:

    kindergarten
    anorak
    igloo
    video
    perestroika
    glasnost
    holocaust
    café
    schadenfreude
    céilidh
    graffiti
    blitz

    ...and so on.
    But i think english is an exception here.it's different about Parsi,it's not in danger of extinction,but imagine a day when %95 of words used by speakers are not Parsi.imagine 50 years further people who call themselves persian speakers can't understand the meaning of most persian words.

    what do you call it?what's the condition of a language then?

    we are moving towards that point,losing more words everyday.
    if english borrows many words,there are still more words created in this language,but what about our language?

    now some people are making Parsi webblogs encouraging people to use Parsi words,but until the government takes no actions,nothing will be proceeded.

  9. #19
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,570
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: What happened to those missing languages on this planet?

    Until the government takes action nothing will happen?

    ~R

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,553
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Quote Originally Posted by atlaisha View Post
    it's different about Parsi,it's not in danger of extinction,but imagine a day when %95 of words used by speakers are not Parsi.imagine 50 years further people who call themselves persian speakers can't understand the meaning of most persian words.
    This is called the "slippery slope" argument, and such arguments are usually wrong. Just because some English words have found their way into Parsi doesn't mean that 95% of all Parsi words will disappear or be forgotten.

    I do understand the concern -- I get annoyed with "Denglisch", which is when English words and phrases are used in German; but after 50 years of Denglisch, German is still 99.9% German. Denglisch is often used in marketing because advertisers think that Germans consider English to be "cool", but often the slogans they come up with are nonsense, bad English, or misunderstood by the general population. I dislike Denglisch not because it endangers German, but because marketing experts are too dazzled by its sheer coolness to realise that most ordinary Germans are actually put off by it. Some Germans use Denglisch to prove that they are broad-minded and tolerant of foreign cultures, when in fact all they prove is that they never paid attention to their English teachers at school.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Learning Foreign Languages: Is it a hobby or a must?
    By Harry Smith in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 158
    Last Post: 02-Dec-2007, 23:39
  2. happened or had happened?
    By vaok in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-Nov-2007, 14:28
  3. The meaning of "the rest of the planet"
    By ian2 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 30-Dec-2006, 07:11
  4. Went missing?
    By glorria in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-Dec-2006, 19:55
  5. "What happened to you" or "What's happened to
    By Cicily21 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-Sep-2004, 10:19

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •