Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 34
  1. #21
    atlaisha is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    301
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss View Post
    This is called the "slippery slope" argument, and such arguments are usually wrong. Just because some English words have found their way into Parsi doesn't mean that 95% of all Parsi words will disappear or be forgotten.

    I do understand the concern -- I get annoyed with "Denglisch", which is when English words and phrases are used in German; but after 50 years of Denglisch, German is still 99.9% German. Denglisch is often used in marketing because advertisers think that Germans consider English to be "cool", but often the slogans they come up with are nonsense, bad English, or misunderstood by the general population. I dislike Denglisch not because it endangers German, but because marketing experts are too dazzled by its sheer coolness to realise that most ordinary Germans are actually put off by it. Some Germans use Denglisch to prove that they are broad-minded and tolerant of foreign cultures, when in fact all they prove is that they never paid attention to their English teachers at school.
    Let me tell you something.even now around 75%of words we use are arabic or have arabic roots.because for a long period of time people kept on using them and because now instead of makng new Parsi words,they teach arabic at schools here and and in arabic text books they encourage students to speak it!!!
    one of our teachers said he had bought a German LEXICON in Iran and every once in a while he recieved mails containing new German words added to the language. while in Iran the newest LEXICON was written 50 years ago and it can answer only half of our today needs.

    it's different in a developing country than in a developped country.if they feel something is in danger in Germany there are organizations that are responsible for that,aren't there? but not here.

    if after 50 years of Denglish German is still 99.9%.Parsi is already only 25%!

    i don't think i can describe the situation here very clearly,but it's not my saying,experts in Parsi have been alerting us how dangerous Finglish(Farsi and English)could be.it's not my attempt to save our language from foreign words,it's attempt of in the knows.there are seminars discussing the ways to solve the problem.

  2. #22
    atlaisha is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    301
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What happened to those missing languages on this planet?

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    Until the government takes action nothing will happen?

    ~R
    ????
    TAKES NO action.i said.
    is that wrong?

  3. #23
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,993
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Quote Originally Posted by atlaisha View Post
    it's different in a developing country than in a developped country.if they feel something is in danger in Germany there are organizations that are responsible for that,aren't there? but not here.
    There's very little a government can do. Countries like France have Academies to oversee things, but they have had very little impact on preventing the entry of new words. Languages have a life and mind of their own and legislation can do very little to change this.

  4. #24
    atlaisha is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    301
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    There's very little a government can do. Countries like France have Academies to oversee things, but they have had very little impact on preventing the entry of new words. Languages have a life and mind of their own and legislation can do very little to change this.
    well i don't know about other countries that much to judge.

    But when i read our history there are some actions that just one king did and they caused some major parts of culture or language to remain for us.
    And there's a poet who lived 1000 years ago called Ferdosi and his poems saved many words and many people call him the saver of Parsi.so you see just one person can effect a great culture so much through the centuries,so how is it possible that a government can't have long term plans to do it? i think government means power,so if it begins a cultural action,it will be the most effective.
    I doubt that the government has little part in that.But that's just my view anyway!
    I don't really mean to make this discussion long.

  5. #25
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,993
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    A great writer can often enrich a language; huge numbers of today's idioms in English come from the works of Shakespeare. However, when countries try to pass laws on language, they brarely succeed. If say, a government passed a law saying that English terms for technology were not to be used, would people follow the law?

  6. #26
    atlaisha is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    301
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Well i didn't exactly mean that the government should pass laws,maybe it wouldn't work as you said.But i mean that a government is the ablest to begin cultural trends.IF it is to keep foreign words to enter a language,government is the best to manage it,not by passing laws,but by establishing cultural organizations to encourage peolpe.I think !

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,554
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Yeah. The French tried that, and it didn't work. The Académie française have, I understand, more or less given up. Ordinary French people simply preferred to say "le weekend" instead of being forced to wrap their tongues around "la fin de la semaine", and that was that.

  8. #28
    atlaisha is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    301
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    Quote Originally Posted by rewboss View Post
    Yeah. The French tried that, and it didn't work. The Académie française have, I understand, more or less given up. Ordinary French people simply preferred to say "le weekend" instead of being forced to wrap their tongues around "la fin de la semaine", and that was that.
    i have no idea! it's getting complicated.In my opinion it would be successful if the government orders to use native words in all text books,newspapers,TV ,radio and anywhere else they can.But since you say it's been tried in France and it just didn't work,there's no more to say.

    i've heard if you speak English to french people in their country,they won't answer you until you speak french.is that true?because if it is,then it means they are willing to use their words and all it takes is some trying and logically it should leave its own effects,even if they use le weekend rather than
    la fin de la semaine at the end.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,554
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    The French do have a reputation for not wanting to speak English, but if there is any truth in that, I think it has more to do with the fact that the French and the British are neighbours, and so don't always get along with each other. The British are notorious, of course, for refusing even to learn foreign languages.

    But you have to understand the difference between speaking English, and using English loanwords in your own language. The difference is huge; a native speaker of English would not suddenly understand everything a Frenchman says just because the Frenchman said "le weekend" somewhere in the middle of his speech.

    Likewise, if I talk about alcohol, that doesn't mean I am speaking Arabic.

  10. #30
    atlaisha is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    301
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What happened to those missing languages in this planet?

    I understand the difference.At least i'm doing my best to do so.

    We have a famous parable in Persian that says:Languages are like seas,they can dissolve new words entering them with no damage.But even every sea has it's own limits for dissolving the impurities,I feel like Persian is reaching it's limits.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Learning Foreign Languages: Is it a hobby or a must?
    By Harry Smith in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 158
    Last Post: 02-Dec-2007, 22:39
  2. happened or had happened?
    By vaok in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-Nov-2007, 13:28
  3. The meaning of "the rest of the planet"
    By ian2 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 30-Dec-2006, 06:11
  4. Went missing?
    By glorria in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-Dec-2006, 18:55
  5. "What happened to you" or "What's happened to
    By Cicily21 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-Sep-2004, 09:19

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •