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Thread: To Mike sensei

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    #1

    To Mike sensei

    In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "joy". In "an excited game", "excited" suggests something manic. Both usage of "exciting" and "excited" are acceptable, right?

    But a sentence like "As soon as Michael Jordan came in, the game became excited." sounds weird to me. I don't know why, but it just sounds strange.

    Why do you think it's weird? Or is such a sentence acceptable?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: To Mike sensei

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "joy". In "an excited game", "excited" suggests something maniac. Both usage of "exciting" and "excited" are acceptable, right?

    But a sentence like "As soon as Michael Jordan came in, the game became excited." sounds weird to me. I don't know why, but it just sounds strange.

    Why do you think it's weird? Or is such a sentence acceptable?
    No. In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "causing excitement". There is no "excited game" that I am aware of. When Jordan entered the game, the game became "exciting"; the crowd became "excited". Something must be able to feel excitement or it cannot be excited (in this context).

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    #3

    Re: To Mike sensei

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    No. In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "causing excitement".
    Yes, that's what I wanted to say.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    There is no "excited game" that I am aware of.
    Are you sure? Can't you say, for example, "an excited conversation"? As far as I'm concerned, I've heard that kind of "excited".

    FYI, check this out:

    "I'm just trying to play a relaxed game," Miller said. "An excited game isn't the style that works up here and luckily for me, I'm more relaxed, not real flashy and flamboyant. I can let the game kind of come to me."

    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/score...JOSE---0nr.htm

    What do you think?

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: To Mike sensei

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    No. In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "causing excitement".
    Yes, that's what I wanted to say.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    There is no "excited game" that I am aware of.
    Are you sure? Can't you say, for example, "an excited conversation"? As far as I'm concerned, I've heard that kind of "excited".

    FYI, check this out:

    "I'm just trying to play a relaxed game," Miller said. "An excited game isn't the style that works up here and luckily for me, I'm more relaxed, not real flashy and flamboyant. I can let the game kind of come to me."

    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/score...JOSE---0nr.htm

    What do you think?
    An excited conversation would be one in which the participants are excited, not the conversation. As for "a relaxed game" or "an excited game", those terms refer to the way the game is played, not the game itself.

    :)

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    #5

    Re: To Mike sensei

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    No. In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "causing excitement".
    Yes, that's what I wanted to say.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    There is no "excited game" that I am aware of.
    Are you sure? Can't you say, for example, "an excited conversation"? As far as I'm concerned, I've heard that kind of "excited".

    FYI, check this out:

    "I'm just trying to play a relaxed game," Miller said. "An excited game isn't the style that works up here and luckily for me, I'm more relaxed, not real flashy and flamboyant. I can let the game kind of come to me."

    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/score...JOSE---0nr.htm

    What do you think?
    These are examples of metaphorical language. An "excited" conversation is one in which the participants are excited. In that context, "exciting" wouldn't convey the appropriate meaning. But it is not really the conversation that is "excited".

    In the second example, it is similar. He refers to o relaxed game as one in which the players are rather letharigic. An excited game is one in which the players are excited, more animated, more aggressive.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: To Mike sensei

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    No. In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "causing excitement".
    Yes, that's what I wanted to say.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    There is no "excited game" that I am aware of.
    Are you sure? Can't you say, for example, "an excited conversation"? As far as I'm concerned, I've heard that kind of "excited".

    FYI, check this out:

    "I'm just trying to play a relaxed game," Miller said. "An excited game isn't the style that works up here and luckily for me, I'm more relaxed, not real flashy and flamboyant. I can let the game kind of come to me."

    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/score...JOSE---0nr.htm

    What do you think?
    An excited conversation would be one in which the participants are excited, not the conversation. As for "a relaxed game" or "an excited game", those terms refer to the way the game is played, not the game itself.

    :)
    GMTA! :wink:

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    #7

    Re: To Mike sensei

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    These are examples of metaphorical language. An "excited" conversation is one in which the participants are excited. In that context, "exciting" wouldn't convey the appropriate meaning. But it is not really the conversation that is "excited".

    In the second example, it is similar. He refers to o relaxed game as one in which the players are rather letharigic. An excited game is one in which the players are excited, more animated, more aggressive.
    I'm afraid I don't have a great mind, but I think alike.

    Yes, I know they are metaphorical. But then, why can't "As soon as M. Jordan came in, the game became excited." be understood as a metaphor? I mean, I think there is a case where the players get excited, animated, once M.Jordan came in and kicks their a..., excuse me, butts.

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    #8

    Re: To Mike sensei

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork
    These are examples of metaphorical language. An "excited" conversation is one in which the participants are excited. In that context, "exciting" wouldn't convey the appropriate meaning. But it is not really the conversation that is "excited".

    In the second example, it is similar. He refers to o relaxed game as one in which the players are rather letharigic. An excited game is one in which the players are excited, more animated, more aggressive.
    I'm afraid I don't have a great mind, but I think alike.

    Yes, I know they are metaphorical. But then, why can't "As soon as M. Jordan came in, the game became excited." be understood as a metaphor? I mean, I think there is a case where the players get excited, animated, once M.Jordan came in and kicks their a..., excuse me, butts.
    Perhaps I would become excited if I saw that Michael Jordan was entering the game, but I would use something else to describe the tenor of the game. Perhaps animated or exciting or interesting.

    :)

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    #9

    Re: To Mike sensei

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Perhaps I would become excited if I saw that Michael Jordan was entering the game, but I would use something else to describe the tenor of the game. Perhaps animated or exciting or interesting.

    :)
    I know you would normally choose those words instead of "excited". But that's not my question. My question is, why can't "As soon as M. Jordan came in, the game became excited." be understood as a metaphor?

    One more thing to ask. You said you would use "animated". If "animated" is possible, why not "excited"?

  6. Will
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    #10

    Re: To Mike sensei

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Perhaps I would become excited if I saw that Michael Jordan was entering the game, but I would use something else to describe the tenor of the game. Perhaps animated or exciting or interesting.

    :)
    I know you would normally choose those words instead of "excited". But that's not my question. My question is, why can't "As soon as M. Jordan came in, the game became excited." be understood as a metaphor?

    One more thing to ask. You said you would use "animated". If "animated" is possible, why not "excited"?
    I see no reason why it can't be understood as a metaphor. When I read it in your first post, that's way I understood it.

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