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Thread: gimmies

  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default gimmies

    Dear teachers,

    As many of us know the written in the Westminster Shorter Catechism "Man's chief end is to glorify God, and to enjoy him for ever", we could paralleled this, saying the US motto should be "The chief end of man is to glorify prosperity and enjoy it forever". A European observer wrote that "desire is enthroned in the mind of the American consumer. They are immersed in a constant barrage of advertisement. Their all economy works to stimulate their desire for food, clothing, automobiles, furniture, jewelry and travel, filling their minds with the "gimmies". It is difficulty to resist unless their focus is disciplined toward going in the right direction.

    Could you explain me the meaning of the word "gimmies". I know the word "gimmick" that have very close meaning probably. Or not? I don,t know.

    Would you help me?

    V.

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    Ouisch is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: gimmies

    In this case, "gimmies" are things that people desire and decide that they have to have. "Gimme this! Gimme that!" ("Gimme" is a way of saying of "give me," and it's traditionally spelled "gimme.") Think of a young child walking down the aisle of a large candy store, pointing at everything in sight, chanting "gimme! gimme!"

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    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: gimmies

    Hi Quisch,

    I am surprised how plainly and intelligibly sound your explanations. Now more than ever I understand the biblical terms "covet" and "covetousness" as the written in Isaiah 56:11 ("Yea, they are greedy dogs that never have enough, and they are shepherds that cannot understand").

    Thank you again.

    V.

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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: gimmies

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    As many of us know the written in the Westminster Shorter Catechism "Man's chief end is to glorify God, and to enjoy him for ever", we could paralleled this, saying the US motto should be "The chief end of man is to glorify prosperity and enjoy it forever". A European observer wrote that "desire is enthroned in the mind of the American consumer. They are immersed in a constant barrage of advertisement. Their all economy works to stimulate their desire for food, clothing, automobiles, furniture, jewelry and travel, filling their minds with the "gimmies". It is difficulty to resist unless their focus is disciplined toward going in the right direction.

    Could you explain me the meaning of the word "gimmies". I know the word "gimmick" that have very close meaning probably. Or not? I don,t know.

    Would you help me?

    V.
    A Ouisch said, the usual spelling is 'gimme'. That, and the underlined errors (the "focus" one is not so much an error as a most unusual collocation - I've never met a focus treated in quite this way ), lead me to think that the writer had an imperfect grasp of the language. "Their all economy" is reminiscent of a similar construction in Shakespearean language; or maybe the writer spoke a language that didn't distinguish between "all" and "whole".

    Where does this piece come from?

    b

  5. #5
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: gimmies

    Hi BobK,

    First of all I would express my frankness gratitude in acknowledgment of your en devour, manifested by rectification my last, dull post.

    Unfortunately I am an imperfect, self-educated English student, who is in straitened circumstances. I have read too much in English recently, I have understood something in my native language, but I couldn't manifest this in your language clearly and lifelike. I have been visiting English class since 2005.
    This English class is implemented by American missionaries who are in our town. I make use of many old fashioned expression on account of I am falling under their influence. I have read this article about 'gimmies" in a magazine "Forerunner". Many words and expression, which I have used in my post were from this article. I know, English language is very tricky and resistivity. I could say, sometimes I think even, it is a strange, mysterious and a little crazy language. There is something queer about it.

    And now I'm very anxious to know somewhat more about your correction. I beg your pardon when I'm wrong. I have a principle "Where there is a will there is a way". I want to find this way.

    1) the written - Could you tell me what is wrong with this expression?. Maybe the absence of the object. In my humble opinion every one have to know that the missing word should be "words." Like as when you write "the poor" I have to know that you mean "the poor people".

    Do you know something about "the written word on the wall"?

    2. to parallel = to show to be analogous, compare or liken
    to make parallel
    parallel (n) the condition of being parallel near similarity or exact agreement in particular

    Parallel between Biblical motto and US. motto.

    3. their all economy ------ their all economy works

    I am trying always to distinguish between right and wrong. In this case I think, it would be better if you would take the trouble to read the next word "works". When you use the "whole" mainly with singular, and if you think that economy is nominative and not adjective, so you are wrong and not I or the original writer, who is most likely to be a university-educated person.

    Please see the following examples: the whole book but all books
    her whole life but all her life
    4. focus

    I think this is a very usual collocation with very plausibility connotation.
    I would try to explain the meaning, which probably you let to slip through your fingers.

    focus = the concentration of attention or energy on something

    "the focus of activity shifted to molecular biology"

    The following sentence is just published in an article about Pulitzer. Does it have a fashionable sounding?
    Pulitzer shifted its focus to human-interest stories, scandal, and sensationalism.

    5. it is difficulty- wrong it is difficult- right adv vs. adj.

    Thank you for the pleasure to read your answer my latter post. So I have the opportunity to exercise my mind and my unpretending English language.

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 17-Oct-2007 at 15:31.

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