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  1. #1
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default sleepy and notice

    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions to ask:

    No.1
    Is there any difference between 'sleepy' and 'dozy'? The definitions of the two are 'tired and wanting to sleep'. But since they are two words I guess there is difference.

    No.2
    Can I say 'official ' notice? If I can then what is the difference between 'official notice ' and 'official announcement'?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  2. #2
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default Re: sleepy and notice

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions to ask:

    No.1
    Is there any difference between 'sleepy' and 'dozy'? The definitions of the two are 'tired and wanting to sleep'. But since they are two words I guess there is difference.

    In this sense, no, Jiang, but dozy [is that the spelling? ] can be used to say that someone is not very bright. Likely this meaning comes from someone who is inattentive because of a lack of sleep.


    Jiang
    ##

  3. #3
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: sleepy and notice

    Dear riverkid,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand it. Could you please also explain No.2? And as to No.1 please read the sentence:

    I was too sleepy to stay till the end of the lecture the other day.
    Could you please explain if I can replace 'sleepy' with ' dozy' ?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    ##

  4. #4
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default Re: sleepy and notice

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear riverkid,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand it. And as to No.1 please read the sentence:

    I was too sleepy to stay till the end of the lecture the other day.
    Could you please explain if I can replace 'sleepy' with ' dozy' ?

    Yes, you can and in this case they'd carry the same meaning.

    But in other situations, 'dozy' means 'dull'/"blonde"/not interesting or interested in things/a bit dumb/stupid.


    ++++++++++
    AskOxford: dozy

    dozy
    2 Brit. informal not alert; stupid.

    +++++++++++++++++++++
    It's not only a BrE use.


    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Could you please also explain No.2?

    Can I say 'official ' notice? If I can then what is the difference between 'official notice ' and 'official announcement'?

    Yes, you can say that, Jiang. With 'notice' there seems to be an implication, at least a possible one that there could be some law/rule/regulation/prohibition involved whereas with 'announcement', it's more neutral, more like simply giving information.

  5. #5
    Amigos4's Avatar
    Amigos4 is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: sleepy and notice

    Riverkid,

    But in other situations, 'dozy' means 'dull'/"blonde"/not interesting or interested in things/a bit dumb/stupid

    I take exception to your comment regarding the use of the word 'dozy'. In what possible instance can 'dozy' be a synonym for 'blonde'?

    Dozy used as a synonym for blonde does nothing more than perpetuate a negative stereotype of a specific group of individuals.

    Cheers,
    Amigos4

  6. #6
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default Re: sleepy and notice

    Quote Originally Posted by amigos4 View Post
    Riverkid,

    But in other situations, 'dozy' means 'dull'/"blonde"/not interesting or interested in things/a bit dumb/stupid

    I take exception to your comment regarding the use of the word 'dozy'. In what possible instance can 'dozy' be a synonym for 'blonde'?

    Dozy used as a synonym for blonde does nothing more than perpetuate a negative stereotype of a specific group of individuals.


    Cheers,
    Amigos4
    Hi Amigo,

    You've asked [in bold] and answered [underlined] your own question.

    It's part of the English language, perhaps a negative part but it's still part of the English language.

  7. #7
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: sleepy and notice


    Dear Riverkid,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. May I say that 'notice' is more formal or official than 'announcement'? Or everyone can make announcement but only government officials can give notice?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    Could you please also explain No.2?

    Can I say 'official ' notice? If I can then what is the difference between 'official notice ' and 'official announcement'?

    Yes, you can say that, Jiang. With 'notice' there seems to be an implication, at least a possible one that there could be some law/rule/regulation/prohibition involved whereas with 'announcement', it's more neutral, more like simply giving information.

  8. #8
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Default Re: sleepy and notice

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post

    Dear Riverkid,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. [May] Can/Could I say that 'notice' is more formal or official than 'announcement'? Or everyone can make announcement but only government officials can give notice?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    First, about the change I made above, Jiang wrt 'may' substituting 'can' or could'.

    'may' sounds a wee bit odd here used as a question because 'may' denotes a certain range of possibility while 'can' and 'could' just say, "is it possible to/that ...?

    'notice' seems more official in the sense that it often has legal connotations. I'd say that there are times that an individual can give official notice provided it carries with it, the force of law.

  9. #9
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: sleepy and notice

    Dear riverkid,

    Thank you very much for pointing out my mistake. And thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand it.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    First, about the change I made above, Jiang wrt 'may' substituting 'can' or could'.

    'may' sounds a wee bit odd here used as a question because 'may' denotes a certain range of possibility while 'can' and 'could' just say, "is it possible to/that ...?

    'notice' seems more official in the sense that it often has legal connotations. I'd say that there are times that an individual can give official notice provided it carries with it, the force of law.

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