Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Super Sonic is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    230
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Which one is the grammatically correct one?

    A) Then why don't you go to where he lives in?
    B) Then why don't you go to where he lives?
    C) Then why don't you go where he lives in?
    D) Then why don't you go where he lives?

    I am really curios about the answer of this question

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,311
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Which one is the grammatically correct one?

    I don't like either of the "lives in" options.

    Why don't you go where he lives is my favorite - D

  3. #3
    riverkid is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,064
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Which one is the grammatically correct one?

    Quote Originally Posted by Super Sonic View Post
    A) Then why don't you go to where he lives in?
    B) Then why don't you go to where he lives?
    C) Then why don't you go where he lives in?
    D) Then why don't you go where he lives?

    I am really curious about the answer of this question
    SS,

    'where' doesn't need 'in'. If you were to change it, as below, then 'in' would be needed.

    A) Then why don't you go to the town/the city he lives in?

    B) *Then why don't you go to the town/the city he lives. *

  4. #4
    Super Sonic is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    230
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Which one is the grammatically correct one?

    Thank you both,

    riverkid, I keep hearing the sentence "Where's the party at?" a lot these days. Why, then, do they use the preposition "at" (Is it also possible to say "Where's the party?") at the end of the sentence? Thanks again for your help :)

  5. #5
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,311
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Which one is the grammatically correct one?

    Ahh! That's the type of situation that "never end a sentence with a preposition" actually does apply to.

    I want to run screaming from the room when I hear "Where you at?"

    It's just WRONG!

    [a fussy writer, apparently, but not a teacher]

  6. #6
    riverkid is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,064
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Which one is the grammatically correct one?

    Quote Originally Posted by Super Sonic View Post
    Thank you both,

    riverkid, I keep hearing the sentence "Where's the party at?" a lot these days. Why, then, do they use the preposition "at" (Is it also possible to say "Where's the party?") at the end of the sentence? Thanks again for your help :)
    First, with all due respect to my esteemed colleague, Barb, let's get one thing clear, absolutely clear. There is NO rule in English, there NEVER has been any rule in English that prevents us from ending a sentence with a preposition.

    There was a prescription, "apparently created ex nihilo in 1672 by the essayist John Dryden", that started this nonsense. "The result is that older people with traditional educations and outlooks still tend to believe that (preposition) stranding is always some kind of mistake. It is not."

    "... : it would be an absurdity to hold that someone who says What are you looking at? or What are you talking about? or Put this back where you got it from is not using English in a correct and normal way."

    {quoted portions from the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language}

    Where's the party at? is, like some of the other examples above, a perfectly natural collocation. You can also say, Where's the party? but it's just not as engaging. We often add prepositions to make our speech more inclusive. In fact, users of English have created thousands upon thousands of phrasal verbs that see daily use.

    get up on sth; pick up, put down/away/back; get into/out of;

    "One of the hallmarks of English is the remarkable profusion of idiomatic and semi-idiomatic constructions into which prepositions enter. ...

    , in abeyance, in person, in sum, on purpose, under protest, ..., in a word, on the spot, under the weather, with one voice"

    [quote from the CGEL]

    Since there never was a rule, the can't be any overall restriction on sentence ending prepositions. Why can you use it sometimes after 'where' but not at other times? Those are simply semantical considerations. Not all words match with all other words.

  7. #7
    Super Sonic is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    230
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Which one is the grammatically correct one?

    I see. Thanks again both of you.

  8. #8
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,311
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Which one is the grammatically correct one?

    Well, I partly agree and partly disagree.

    I agree that there was never any (valid) rule about it. He's the guy I went with is perfectly fine, and vastly preferable to "He is the guy with whom I went." Ugh!

    But I will continue to shudder and say "Ugh" when I hear "Where're we meeting at?" "Where's the party at?" So I think it's okay if we agree to disagree on that one. I won't be horrified that you do NOT shudder if you don't be horrified that I do.

  9. #9
    riverkid is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,064
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Which one is the grammatically correct one?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Well, I partly agree and partly disagree.

    I agree that there was never any (valid) rule about it. He's the guy I went with is perfectly fine, and vastly preferable to "He is the guy with whom I went." Ugh!

    Hi Barb,

    This isn't a matter of personal differences, it's a matter of how language actually works. Of course we all have our preferences but again, preferences have zero to do with what's grammatical, what's actually part of the English language.

    The reason that "He is the guy with whom I went." is an Ugh is that the registers are mixed. We don't normally use formal collocations with informal collocations, but in the right situation, a more formal language situation, a fronted preposition combined with 'whom' would be very appropriate.


    But I will continue to shudder and say "Ugh" when I hear "Where're we meeting at?" "Where's the party at?" So I think it's okay if we agree to disagree on that one. I won't be horrified that you do NOT shudder if you don't be horrified that I do.

    By all means, Barb, prefer away. It's your language too. I won't be, and I never am horrified by personal language choices. But these have no place in teaching a language. How do you quantify the level of 'ughness'? What place does 'ugh' have in determining, scientifically, the parameters of anything.

    Again, you have your preferences and that's fine but what could possibly be the difference, grammatically/semantically/syntactically between,

    "Where're we meeting at?" OR "Where's the party at?"

    and

    "He's the guy I went with" ?

    ###

Similar Threads

  1. The sentences above/below are correct
    By user_gary in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-Jun-2009, 08:12
  2. 2. Is this sentence correct grammatically?
    By Mad-ox in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 25-Oct-2006, 20:50
  3. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 25-Oct-2006, 06:59
  4. is this sentence grammatically correct?
    By bbmak in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Jul-2006, 09:38
  5. Are All IELTS Answers Correct?
    By artast in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-Aug-2005, 00:46

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •