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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan
    Then I was wrong. Sorry.
    Though the most common would be with the indefinite article,I have heard it without here in the UK. I wouldn't say it's an error- it looks like another AE\BE thing.
    You know, I've heard it, too, in BE. It must be a dialect variant of some sort, maybe even an idiolect. In Asia, I've heard 'unform' used as a non-count noun by EFL speakers. I've always wondered what the reason for that was because I know it's considered a count noun in BE--the Standard. As for grammar, well, I agree with ya'll: It needs an article or a plural marker. It's a count noun. :D

  2. #12
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    Google finds alot of 'to wear uniform' examples eg.
    "US Military Instruction authorizes retirees to wear uniform on occasion"

    FRC

  3. #13
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    Thank you all. You're quite instructive, and you have helped to confirm my opinion. Now I know that some people use is as an uncount noun, but I'll consider that an exception.
    (By the way, Francois, I don't consider finding something in google proof to the fact that it's right , many people make mistakes while they're writing and not all people are so worried about grammar as we are!) :wink:

  4. #14
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    Google finds alot of 'to wear uniform' examples
    The key word is alot. I pay attention to the source of the example too. The "men in uniform" I referred to comes from Cambridge dicts.

    I for one like the idea of uniform as uncountable (in addition to the the usual countable noun), as opposed to "civil clothes". When you say "a uniform", it sounds a bit like "wear a uniform, whatever the one" (I know that's not what it means, but it's nice if the sentence grammatically conveys the idea). "to wear the uniform" would be ok, but it doesn't always work, depending on context.
    In French, we have both eg.
    1) Porter un uniforme (= wear a uniform)
    2) Porter l' uniforme (= wear uniform)
    The first one is almost always fine and natural (as in English I think), but often the second one is more, say, precise (depending on the context).
    Eg. "she loves men in uniform" is somewhat better IMO than "shes loves men in a uniform", even though both seem perfectly correct.

    I'm not sure I'm quite clear -- oh well...

    FRC

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Google finds alot of 'to wear uniform' examples
    The key word is alot. I pay attention to the source of the example too. The "men in uniform" I referred to comes from Cambridge dicts.

    I for one like the idea of uniform as uncountable (in addition to the the usual countable noun), as opposed to "civil clothes". When you say "a uniform", it sounds a bit like "wear a uniform, whatever the one" (I know that's not what it means, but it's nice if the sentence grammatically conveys the idea). "to wear the uniform" would be ok, but it doesn't always work, depending on context.
    In French, we have both eg.
    1) Porter un uniforme (= wear a uniform)
    2) Porter l' uniforme (= wear uniform)
    The first one is almost always fine and natural (as in English I think), but often the second one is more, say, precise (depending on the context).
    Eg. "she loves men in uniform" is somewhat better IMO than "shes loves men in a uniform", even though both seem perfectly correct.

    I'm not sure I'm quite clear -- oh well...

    FRC
    I get what you mean, but please take note of the fact that you say men in uniform. As an uncount noun you yourself have only used it with the preposition (which I do accept).

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