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  1. #41
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    Default Re: Here is the story you asked about, RonBee.

    That one is a little confusing, and it is not exactly idiomatic English. (A "from" almost always has to have a "to" connected to it. Also, you can meet somebody by a classroom but not by a class.)

    I meant here the time period. When I started the story I said that Latifa went to the library and she did not want to be late; this lecture was the reason. It is Ron's lecture.


    How would you change "British married teacher" to make it idiomatic English?

    I may delete the nationality and say that he was married. May I say, “He was a married teacher”?

  2. #42
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    Default Re: Here is the story you asked about, RonBee.

    That one is a little confusing, and it is not exactly idiomatic English. (A "from" almost always has to have a "to" connected to it. Also, you can meet somebody by a classroom but not by a class.)

    I meant here the time period. When I started the story I said that Latifa went to the library and she did not want to be late; this lecture was the reason. It is Ron's lecture.


    How would you change "British married teacher" to make it idiomatic English?

    I may delete the nationality and say that he was married. May I say, “He was a married teacher”?

  3. #43
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    Default Re: Here is the story you asked about, RonBee.

    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    That one is a little confusing, and it is not exactly idiomatic English. (A "from" almost always has to have a "to" connected to it. Also, you can meet somebody by a classroom but not by a class.)

    I meant here the time period. When I started the story I said that Latifa went to the library and she did not want to be late; this lecture was the reason. It is Ron's lecture.


    How would you change "British married teacher" to make it idiomatic English?

    I may delete the nationality and say that he was married. May I say, “He was a married teacher”?
    The more important qualities tend to be put closer to the noun. In this case we would say the person is a married British teacher. The nationality is more important, and the marital status is additional information that is not as important.

    :)

  4. #44
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    Default Re: Here is the story you asked about, RonBee.

    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    That one is a little confusing, and it is not exactly idiomatic English. (A "from" almost always has to have a "to" connected to it. Also, you can meet somebody by a classroom but not by a class.)

    I meant here the time period. When I started the story I said that Latifa went to the library and she did not want to be late; this lecture was the reason. It is Ron's lecture.


    How would you change "British married teacher" to make it idiomatic English?

    I may delete the nationality and say that he was married. May I say, “He was a married teacher”?
    The more important qualities tend to be put closer to the noun. In this case we would say the person is a married British teacher. The nationality is more important, and the marital status is additional information that is not as important.

    :)

  5. #45
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    Default Re: Here is the story you asked about, RonBee.

    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    How would you change "British married teacher" to make it idiomatic English?

    Can I say, British teacher only? I don't know how to say it in an idiomatic English.
    I am working now on what you have corrected. I will answer all your "what do you think" and your other questions when I will finish.
    You are doing a very nice work to me, and I don't want to watse it. I wonder how can you find a time to do this wonderful job.
    I spend all my spare time (and then some) on this forum. :)

    Cas did a wonderful job with that, didn't she? :)

    (Say: "I wonder how you can find the time to do this wonderful job.")

    :)

  6. #46
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    Default Re: Here is the story you asked about, RonBee.

    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    How would you change "British married teacher" to make it idiomatic English?

    Can I say, British teacher only? I don't know how to say it in an idiomatic English.
    I am working now on what you have corrected. I will answer all your "what do you think" and your other questions when I will finish.
    You are doing a very nice work to me, and I don't want to watse it. I wonder how can you find a time to do this wonderful job.
    I spend all my spare time (and then some) on this forum. :)

    Cas did a wonderful job with that, didn't she? :)

    (Say: "I wonder how you can find the time to do this wonderful job.")

    :)

  7. #47
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    Default Re: Here is the story you asked about, RonBee.

    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof


    “I will go to the library, but I won’t be late. Ok, see you later” said Latifa to her friend Reem.
    Unfortunately, it is not clear what the connection is between going to the library and being late.

    I wanted to show how was Latifa careful not to be late of Ron’s classes.
    That's pretty much what you should say. Say that Latifa didn't want to be late to any of Mr. Ron's classes. Or that she made sure she wasn't late to Mr. Ron's class. (Note the use of "to" there.)


    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    Latifa is studying English Language and Literature major in the university. Reem is her best friend.
    [That first sentence doesn't quite make it. Perhaps:
    • Latifah is studying English at the university. Her major is English Literature.



    Can I say:
    Latifa is studying English Language and Literature at the university.
    [/quote]

    If that's the name of the course, yes.

    :)


    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    They are together since the beginning of their study as English major students.
    You need to decide that tense you want the narrative to be in--past or present? If it's past tense, say:
    • They had been together since the beginning of their studies as English majors.


    I would like to use the past tense.[/quote]

    Then it's "had been" there.

    :)

  8. #48
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    Default Re: Here is the story you asked about, RonBee.

    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof


    “I will go to the library, but I won’t be late. Ok, see you later” said Latifa to her friend Reem.
    Unfortunately, it is not clear what the connection is between going to the library and being late.

    I wanted to show how was Latifa careful not to be late of Ron’s classes.
    That's pretty much what you should say. Say that Latifa didn't want to be late to any of Mr. Ron's classes. Or that she made sure she wasn't late to Mr. Ron's class. (Note the use of "to" there.)


    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    Latifa is studying English Language and Literature major in the university. Reem is her best friend.
    [That first sentence doesn't quite make it. Perhaps:
    • Latifah is studying English at the university. Her major is English Literature.



    Can I say:
    Latifa is studying English Language and Literature at the university.
    [/quote]

    If that's the name of the course, yes.

    :)


    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    They are together since the beginning of their study as English major students.
    You need to decide that tense you want the narrative to be in--past or present? If it's past tense, say:
    • They had been together since the beginning of their studies as English majors.


    I would like to use the past tense.[/quote]

    Then it's "had been" there.

    :)

  9. #49
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    Default Re: Here is the story you asked about, RonBee.

    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    That's a little confusing. The first sentence doesn't indicate that Ms Mouza left the room. Perhaps:
    [list]Latifa was in math class when the administrator came and took Ms Mouza, Latifa's math teacher, out of the room for a private conversation.

    Yes, I meant to say that the teacher went outside the class. Your suggestion will make it clearer.


    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    Ms. Mouza looked sadly toward Latifa and she sat down next to her. “Latifa… I want to tell you something.” Latifa looked at Ms. Mouza’s face and asked her to correct the Math problem, which she has solved when Ms. Mouza was outside the class.
    That is somewhat of an odd response by Latifa. I would expect her to wait to hear what Ms Mouza had to say instead of telling her teacher about a math problem she had solved while the teacher was out of class.

    I wanted to emphasize Latifa’s response in order to show her understanding of her teacher’s saying.
    Perhaps:
    • Latifah acted as if she didn't hear what the teacher said, and she asked her to help her with a math problem.


    What do you think?

    :)

  10. #50
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    Default Re: Here is the story you asked about, RonBee.

    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    That's a little confusing. The first sentence doesn't indicate that Ms Mouza left the room. Perhaps:
    [list]Latifa was in math class when the administrator came and took Ms Mouza, Latifa's math teacher, out of the room for a private conversation.

    Yes, I meant to say that the teacher went outside the class. Your suggestion will make it clearer.


    Quote Originally Posted by Latoof
    Ms. Mouza looked sadly toward Latifa and she sat down next to her. “Latifa… I want to tell you something.” Latifa looked at Ms. Mouza’s face and asked her to correct the Math problem, which she has solved when Ms. Mouza was outside the class.
    That is somewhat of an odd response by Latifa. I would expect her to wait to hear what Ms Mouza had to say instead of telling her teacher about a math problem she had solved while the teacher was out of class.

    I wanted to emphasize Latifa’s response in order to show her understanding of her teacher’s saying.
    Perhaps:
    • Latifah acted as if she didn't hear what the teacher said, and she asked her to help her with a math problem.


    What do you think?

    :)

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